Monthly Archives: August 2010

Happy 96th Birthday, Mother

Carl & Stella Edens, 1943

You are a grand lady!

Stella Margaret Sexton Edens – born August 30, 1914

2 Comments

Filed under 1943, California, Family

Cat Humor

2 Comments

Filed under Cats, Humor

Vintage Kitchen Altered Book Ephemera, Part II

(Click on images to enlarge, then click again on the magnifying glass.)

Leave a comment

Filed under 1943, Advertisements, Ephemera, Food, Hints, Making Do, Menus, Recipes, Thrift, Thrift, Vintage Advertisements, Vintage Magazines, World War II

Vintage Kitchen Altered Book Ephemera

These pictures are from the October 1, 1943 issue of The Family Circle magazine. Some magazines haven’t changed all that much over the years. Family Circle has changed a lot. In ’43, it contained only 20 pages, included current events and a movie review, a short story and was printed in black and white on paper which was not slick. The cost is not printed on the cover, but I’m guessing that it was about .05. (Click on the image for an enlarged view, then click again on the magnifying glass. It will then be readable.)


The Sweetheart Toilet Soap ad is particularly nice for me, because that’s the brand of soap my mother bought for our bathroom (besides the Lava that was for my dad. Boy, I only used that soap once!). Sweetheart was pink and pretty and had a lovely fragrance.


I’ll be scanning in lots of vintage ads, recipes and illustrations and will share some of them here. I’m working on an altered book. It’s been awhile since I’ve been in an altered book round robin, and my sister (Fran) suggested we invite Abby and Cathy to join us in one with the theme of “Vintage Kitchens”. We will each choose a more specific theme for our own books then write a few rules for the others to follow when they work on ours.

Fran has chosen the 1950s, with emphasis on the colors of turquoise and pink.

For mine, I’ve chosen a 1940’s look with red and white, and accents of green and yellow.

Leave a comment

Filed under 1940s, 1943, Advertisements, Altered Books, Cooking, Crafts - Cheap, Crafts - Paper, Ephemera, Food, Making Do, Recipes, Thrift, Vintage Magazines, World War II

“Thank You for the food we eat”: a Dick and Jane Altered Book

Mother, Jane, Father, Sally, and Dick

Dick and Jane readers were a wonderful part of my childhood – I still get such a cozy feeling just looking at them. So, when my sister, Abby and I decided to exchange little handmade Thanksgiving books last year, I chose the Dick and Jane theme for the “We Give Thanks” book I made for Fran.

Dick, Jane and Sally

Thank you for the food we eat,

Spot, Tim and Puff

Thank you for the world so sweet,

Jane, Sally and Dick

Thank you for the birds that sing,

Mother, Dick, Sally and Tim

Thank you, God, for everything.

Jane

Amen.

First I photocopied illustrations from a Dick and Jane reprint that I’d bought a few years ago at Wal-Mart (these reprints were from the 1950s’ editions). I also have 2 copies of original editions, and I wish I had used them to copy because the pictures are much better. A copy of a copy is very often not a good thing. But anyway, I selected pictures that I thought would illustrate the prayer we learned in Kindergarten at Mingo School (before our schools became so God-less).

The title “We Give Thanks” is in keeping with the Dick and Jane series, for instance, “We Work and Play”,  “We Look and See”, “We Come and Go”, etc.

To give it the feel of a board book, I made my own chipboard pages from a Coca-Cola carton. I probably should’ve rounded the edges slightly.

The background layout for the illustrations were enlarged and photocopied prose pages from the Dick and Jane books.  The edges were distressed with blue ink; brown might’ve been better.

For the prayer itself, I photocopied a page of old penmanship-style scrapbook paper. Now I realize that I could’ve bought a whole tablet of that paper at Dollar General for about $1.00.  Anyway,to get the look of children’s printing, I used a pencil in my left hand (I am right-handed). As you can see from the “Thank you God for everything” page, I accidentally wrote “Lord”. I need to fix that.

To finish, I punched 3 holes on each page and used blue gingham ribbon to bind it. On the back I used a “Handmade by” stamp and signed my name.

Now I think I’ll make one to keep for myself.

6 Comments

Filed under 1950s, Altered Books, Books, Children's, Cozy, Crafts, Crafts - Cheap, Crafts - Paper, Faith, Free, Mingo, Thanksgiving, Thrift

Co-ordinated Bookmarks

Many of the books I read (both fiction and non-fiction) were either written in the past or are about the past. And since I’m very interested in cultural history, I like to make bookmarks that co-ordinate with the time period I’m reading about.


Last week, I re-read “Julia’s Hope”, a novel by Leisha Kelly, set in 1931.


I am currently reading “So Well Remembered” by James Hilton. It was published in 1945, but most of the story centers around 1921. When I looked in my paper stash, I found this image from a John Peacock fashion book and it just fit. The tag was one that an ebay seller enclosed with my purchase.

It’s a free craft because I use only what I already have and it adds a little extra pleasure to reading. And opening the book to a co-ordinated bookmark is a lot nicer than opening it to an old receipt or envelope (which I’ve employed many times).

Leave a comment

Filed under 1921, 1930s, Books, Crafts, Crafts - Cheap, Crafts - Paper, Ephemera, Fashion, Fiction, Free, Thrift, Using What You Have

1956 Pream and Fountain Pen ads

Ballpoint pens were still a relatively new invention and many people still used fountain pens. They are a pleasure to use.

A Cremora or CoffeeMate-type product.

2 Comments

Filed under 1956, Ephemera, Vintage Magazines

Mobile Home

Isn’t this the cutest thing?

My sister and I were on our way to Sparks Fly Studio in Skiatook when I spotted this little house on the road last May. Fran very kindly pulled over so I could get the photos.

Main Street, Skiatook, Oklahoma

It would’ve been great to have talked to the guy and gotten the story: what was it built for, where did he get it, what was he going to do with it?

2 Comments

Filed under America, Humor, Oklahoma, Skiatook, Transportation

1950s Cars, Part III

1956 Pontiac station wagons

FOUR OF AMERICA’S BEST BUYS…for Beauty, Bigness and Blazing Go!

1956 Pontiac 860 4-Door


860 4-DOOR, 3-seat, with room for 9 passengers…both rear seats fold for extra carrying space

Why not have fun while you’re being practical?

Here are four wonderful ways to do just that! Each one is sleek and exciting as a sports car, handy as a pickup truck…and extra big in the bargain with a road-leveling 122″ wheelbase!

But the really breath-taking difference in Pontiac’s fabulous family wagons is the way the GO!

There’s nothing like it…because they’re powered by the greatest performance team ever offered in a station wagon…the mighty 227-horsepower Strato-Streak V-8 and revolutionary Strato-Flight Hydra-Matic Drive*!

That big, extra power means handling ease and liveliness you’ve never known in a big car before.

And wait ’til you hear the prices. They’re as practical and exciting…as the cars themselves…starting right down with the lowest!

See your Pontiac dealer soon – see why these fabulous ’56 Pontiacs are rated America’s best station wagon buys!

* An extra-cost option.

’56 STRATO-STREAK PONTIAC WITH STRATO-FLIGHT HYDRA-MATIC

860 2 Door, 2-seat

1956 Pontiac 860 2-Door, 2-seat


860 2-DOOR, 2-seat, low-priced suburban favorite available in 48 color combinations

1956 Pontiac Star Chief Safari


STAR CHIEF SAFARI 2-DOOR, 2-seat custom de luxe style leader

1956 Pontiac 870 4-Door, 2-seat


870 4-DOOR, 2-seat, rear seat folds flat for 7 1/2′ carrying space with gate closed, 9′ gate open

PONTIAC MOTOR DIVISION OF GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION”

These ads are from the April 27, 1956 Collier’s Magazine.

Leave a comment

Filed under 1950s, 1956, Cars, Ephemera, Made in the U.S.A., Transportation, Vintage Magazines

1950s Cars, Part II

1956 Lincoln

A Lincoln is to dress up and go

A Lincoln is a moving idea with 285 horsepower to second the motion

Each inch is luxury: 222 new inches of beauty and confort based on strength and safety and power

A Lincoln is one of the Ford family of fine cars

Every mile from the dealers’ doors these are the five best ways to get from place to place

the Ford * the Thunderbird * the Mercury * the Lincoln * the Continental”

1956 De Soto Firedome 4-Door Station Wagon

“One of 5
FORWARD LOOK VALUES OTHER CARS DON’T HAVE!

1 Pushbutton PowerFlite. Chrysler Corporation leads the field again with the driving advance of the year! Like magic – you just push a button and go! No levers or gears to bother with. Pushbutton PowerFlite is as easy as ringing a doorbell. Its simple mechanical design has been fully tested and perfected. Why not try it today?

2 Power Steering all the time! Other cars still haven’t caught up with Chrysler Corporation’s full-time Power Steering! It helps you 60 minutes of every driving hour!

3 Extra Power Longer! No other American passenger car V-8 engines have dome-type combustion chambers!

4 Safest Brakes! Chrysler Corporation brings you the biggest advance in brakes in 25 years! Easier, surer, less adjusting, longer lining life!

5 Brightest Design Note of 1956! THE FLIGHT-SWEEP – one clean aerodynamic sweep from headlight to upswept rear fender!

You get so much more for what you pay in a car of Chrysler Corporation. See your dealer now!

CHRYSLER CORPORATION
PLYMOUTH * DODGE * DE SOTO * CHRYSLER * IMPERIAL

See Chrysler Corporation’s Great TV Shows, “Shower of Stars” and “Climax!” Thursday nights, CBS-TV

I apologize for the poor quality of these photographs. It has again become difficult to scan things in, and really difficult to get a good photo. When you click on each picture to enlarge, the quality improves.
These ads are from the April 27, 1956 Collier’s Magazine

Leave a comment

Filed under 1950s, 1956, Cars, Ephemera, Made in the U.S.A., Transportation, Vintage Magazines