Monthly Archives: January 2011

Books Read, January 2011,

*Death of a Charming Man by M.C. Beaton. First published in 1994, this is Beaton’s 10th Hamish Macbeth mystery. The story centers around the effect of English newcomer, Peter Hynd on the small village of Drim in northern Scotland. Peter has a malicious streak and it becomes his downfall. Lochdubh police sergeant Macbeth warns Hynd to tread easily around the local Highlanders, but of course, he’s heedless.

The Hamish Macbeth series are cozy mysteries, though not quite as cozy as Agatha Christie’s books. Whose are? Grotesque descriptions are rare, along with bad language and sexual content. That being said, there was one section with a very un-cozy word.

Possibly it’s my imagination, but it seems that Beaton gets a little bored with the romantic relationship between Hamish and Priscilla Halburton-Smythe. Priscilla is not a sympathetic character; actually she’s fairly off-putting. Am I supposed to like her?

Hamish on the other hand, is someone I’d love to have as my local constable, despite his failings (mooching, laziness and all too often, a lack of loyalty).

Are there really policemen like him somewhere?

*Death in the Downs by Simon Brett
What’s the deal with so many current books? No happy marriages, affairs galore, no traditional religion, endorsements of New Age silliness.

Technically, this one is well written. The story moves along, clues are injected along with red herrings, it’s interesting and it ties up most of the loose ends.

On the other hand, it’s full of excessive drinking, mysticism and bad men. There is only one good/sympathetic man in the whole book.

I suppose Simon Brett really is a man, but he writes like a world-weary, jilted feminist who never met an alternative religion that he/she didn’t like.

It’s been a few years since I last read a Simon Brett mystery. The cynicism surprised me.

There are virtually no happy marriages in this book. Carole’s husband left her, one woman with an overbearing husband uses tranquilizers, another wife drinks, one couple is uncommunicative and then they part, and the “doctor” is a serial philanderer. Jude is not married but has an unpleasant relationship with her paramour, which we are thankfully spared the details. Parent/child relationships don’t fare much better.

And speaking of drinking … that’s practically all these characters do, besides intimidate, murder and commit mayhem and masochism. They are constantly drinking, not just at the pub but opening the second bottle of wine, etc.

New Age therapies are repeatedly defended- no matter how bizarre. At the end, we are treated to a discourse on the emptiness of traditional religion by the killer.

The writing is adept, the content leaves something to be desired. Come to think of it, Simon Brett seems more jaded than cynical. Perhaps he thinks he’s post-modern. Maybe he writes because his New Age healer prescribes it.

*Witness for the Prosecution by Agatha Christie. Years ago, Joe and I saw the movie with Marlene Dietrich and Tyrone Power, an excellent production. Since I’m always on the lookout for copies of Agatha Christie books, I bought a paperback copy and read it last week.

The first chapter told the whole story of the movie, so I thought there had been some Hollywood interference with the original and that there must be a lot more that had been pared down. The second chapter had a whole new cast of characters, but many books do that – using the first several chapters to introduce new settings, etc… By the beginning of the 3rd chapter, I realized that it was a book of short stories! I looked at the front and back covers and the flyleaf and nowhere did it say it was a book of short stories, so I felt a little less foolish.

The second odd thing about the book, was that the day I finished it, I watched a movie on Hulu titled “Love From a Stranger”. As it went on, I thought that it seemed very familiar. When the wife read the notation in her husband’s diary “9:00 p.m.”, I knew! It was the same story as “Philomel Cottage”, chapter 8 in Witness for the Prosecution. I checked the imdb page for the movie to see if they acknowledged Christie’s original story and indeed they did.

Now, it may seem that I was pretty stupid not to connect it before but lots of details had been changed. Christie wrote the book in 1924 and I think the tales are contemporary to that time; the movie is set in 1901. In the book the husband claims to be a photographer; in the movie he’s a scientist. Her sudden influx of money is explained by an inheritance in the book, and the film has her winning the pools (lottery). And there are many other things expanding the original story – so it wasn’t a clearcut case of simply not paying attention on my part.

I thought all that it was kind of a quirky co-incidence and it has absolutely no significance. Just an interesting interlude.

*Possessed: the Life of Joan Crawford, by Donald Spoto I can’t look or think of Joan Crawford without thinking Mommy Dearest, so when I saw this on the New Books shelf at the library I hesitated. But I was willing to consider that maybe that was a distorted view of her when I saw that Spoto claimed that she was misunderstood and had new archival information. Perhaps Christina was merely bitter after having been left out of the will.

But I will never know because I can’t get past the alternative lifestyle agenda of the author. He takes every opportunity to campaign for it and it’s tiring.

Hollywood history has long fascinated me, but I’ll have to satisfy my curiosity elsewhere.

Unfinished and NOT RECOMMENDED

The Blue Sapphire by D.E. Stevenson This was a re-read for me. Back in the mid-197s, Wal-Mart carried a lot of D.E. Stevenson reprints with new artwork on the covers and I bought several of them. The Blue Sapphire was originally published in 1963 but the cover on my book is straight out of the 1970s: her ruffled, loose dress, wedge sandals and long, flowing curls; his open necked shirt with the big collar and styled hair. When I read a book, I really like to picture the time setting in my mind – and the early 60s were not like the 70s, in any fashion.

Therefore, I see this as an opportunity to do an altered bookjacket.

The Blue Sapphire is a cozy romance and a quick read. It’s pleasant with likable characters, although I must say that I found Julie ( the female protagonist) a bit stuffy at times. Perhaps that makes it more believable.

(Dorothy Emily Peploe’s father was Robert Louis Stevenson’s cousin; she used her maiden name when she wrote, but the copyright is in her married name.)

RECOMMENDED

*Tides by V.M. Caldwell (Juvenile Fiction) The sequel to The Ocean Within targets 5th – 9th grade readers. It’s the continuing story of 12 year old Elizabeth who was adopted into the Sheridan family one year previously. All the Sheridan grandchildren spend each summer at their grandmother’s house on the ocean. Which ocean? We don’t know, but the clues are: the kids spot Vermont license tags on the journey there; it’s not Maine and there are pine trees right up to the beach. That’s a minor issue. However, the author doesn’t tell us why Elizabeth is afraid of the water, which is the main issue in the book. At the end, we are left to kind of …well… guess.

The writing is well crafted and held my interest. The subject matter is enjoyable – a house full of cousins, summertime, the beach, a town with a movie theater that shows W.C. Fields films. This is fun stuff to me. But the dark cloud is the intrusion of social issues – Elizabeth aids an environmentalist who’s trying to catch polluters.

Tides is a publication of Milkweed Editions, which is a non-profit publisher who “publishes with the intention of making a humane impact on society, in the belief that literature is a transformative art uniquely able to convey the essential experiences of the human heart and spirit”, according their note at the back of the book. At least they are upfront and bold in stating their goal.

My beef is that 10 year olds don’t need the weight of the world on their shoulders and how dare authors and publishers try to rob them of their childhood.

What they didn’t mind was inserting some gaia earth worship and a brief little ceremony for “mother ocean”. Perhaps they think they’re being ecumenical because they also devote very short passages to Judaism, Catholicism, as well as mentioning Hinduism, Buddhism and agnosticism. Talk about all-inclusive.

One very surprising element was the subject of spanking. Grandmother spanks. Everyone agrees that she’s fair about it, and there’s the agnostic mother’s disapproval of it, but I thought it was unusual aspect of a modern novel.

NOT RECOMMENDED for children.

The beach/family vacation storyline was much better done in The Secret of Cross Bone Hill by Wilson Gage.


*Theater Shoes
by Noel Streatfield (Juvenile Fiction) It was in the movie “You’ve Got Mail” that I first heard of the Shoe books. I didn’t know if they were real books, or just something fictionalized for that story. When I did an internet search (remember this was about 1998) the cupboard was bare.

Then when I looking over the Books for a Donation area at the library – there it was – Theater Shoes! I added it to my stack of purchases, brought it home and read it right away.

It’s a delightful episode in the continuing story of a Dancing/Theater school in London. This go-round was written in 1945 and concerns 3 children whose guardian grandfather dies. Since their mother is deceased and their father is missing in action with the British army, they have nowhere else to go but to a grandmother they’ve never met. Unbeknownst to them, their maternal relatives are all theater people and they are enrolled in Madame Fidolia’s Children’s Academy of Dancing and Stage Training, which to them is like falling down the rabbit hole.

This passage from`Chapter 14 describes how the war had changed the appearance of a first night theater audience: “The audience was exactly as Miriam had said it would be, and not a bit as Alice had described it. The women were in uniform or dark overcoats, and most of them had big boots with fur linings. The men were in uniform or exactly as they had come on from work. Nobody was dressed up. Aunt Lindsey was looking very nice in a black frock and fur coat, but only nice in the way that anybody might look in the afternoon.”

Even though it’s written for older children, Theater Shoes is a charming book which held my interest.

RECOMMENDED

*Night by Elie Wiesel This is a tough book to read, which I knew going in. It is the story of Wiesel and his Jewish family in the early days of World War II, their deportation to Auschwitz, then Buchenwald. At first there is his father, mother and sister. The mother and sister are separated from them, then his father is gone.

It’s the story of the price of survival.

It is a horrible and cruel book. One that we need to read every time we’re told that Israel is expendable.

The Gentile world turned it’s collective back on the Jews. They have no other place to go but Israel.

God bless his chosen people and the land He gave them.

RECOMMENDED for the strong

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Filed under Books, Books, Children, Children's, Cozy, Current Events, England, Fiction, History, Holocaust, Politics, World War II

Costume Jewelry Repair

Somewhere along the line I acquire this brooch, which looks to me as if it’s from the 1950s. It’s a pretty little piece but was missing one of the stylized hearts and a green rhinestone. Probably a replacement could’ve been easily found for the rhinestone, but the heart was a bit tricky. They’re probably mother-of-pearl, or at least supposed to look like they are.

Even though I wore it a few times like it was, I began thinking about possible solutions for the missing pieces.

And I remembered Stickles.

Here it is after one coat of gold for the heart shape, and green on the rhinestone part.

On close inspection it wouldn’t fool anyone, but then, I hope not too many people will have their faces right up close to my lapel.

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Filed under Femininity, Jewelry, Making Do, Thrift, Using What You Have

Anxiety, the thief

Go here for the previous Charles Spurgeon quote.

This page is taken from the small book “Heroes of the Faith, Memorable Quotes from Men and Women of Faith”, Daniel Partner-Editor.

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Filed under Books, Books, Faith, Quotes

1963 Riviera

Every time we see a vintage Riviera, my husband always thinks about his Aunt Betty, who drove one out in Orange County, California.

No one in my neighborhood even owned a Buick.

The above photo is taken from the June 18, 1963 issue of LOOK magazine.

The magazine cost .25.

The car’s base price was $4,333 and with options ran up to $5,000 according to the Wikipedia article, which has some nice photos and the history of the car.

The average salary was $5,807 that year. Can you imagine buying a car that equaled your income?

For a list of other interesting facts and price about 1963, as well as a cool youtube video of Johnny Cash singing “Ring of Fire”, go here.

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Filed under 1960's, 1963, Cars, Transportation, Vintage Advertisements, Vintage Magazines

Country White Bread


This is the easiest and most dependable yeast bread I’ve ever made. The recipe came from a Country Living magazine almost 25 years ago. Lately I’ve baked some every few days.

COUNTRY WHITE BREAD

1 pkg. yeast
1/2 c. warm water
1 T. sugar

Dissolve yeast in sugar and water to prove.

Add:
1/1/4 t. salt
1/4 c. sugar
5 1/2 c. flour
1 c. water
3 T. oil

Mix together and knead for about 8 minutes.

Oil large mixing bowl, place dough in bowl and turn once.
Cover with a clean tea towel and put in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about an hour.

Place risen dough on floured board, punch down, work out the air pockets.
Shape into loaves, and place into greased pans.
Let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk.

Bake at 350 until done; depending on your oven this could be from 35 minutes to 1 hour.

Notes
*When I want a wheat loaf, I dissolve the tailings from a bag of Raisin Bran cereal in a little warm water or milk, then add it to the mixture. Years ago, I bought regular bran and wheat germ, but when I added them to the recipe my husband said it gave it an unpleasant texture. For some reason, the fine stuff at the bottom of the cereal bag works well, which is especially nice because I don’t want it floating in my cereal bowl and it seems like a waste to just compost it.

*Contrary to what I used to think, it is possible to over-oil the bowl.

*For taller loaves, I use two different sizes of pans – one large and one medium. When I use both large pans, the loaves are smaller.

*For a nicer crust, I butter the top about midway through the baking.

*I have discovered the Best Place for the dough to rise. Well, at least in the winter. Under our Vermont Castings wood stove. I couldn’t believe it. It rose twice as fast but wasn’t too hot. Perfect.

*Sometimes I just don’t get a good rising. Maybe it’s a humid day. I don’t know. But when that happens, it can be used for croûtons. This was my husbands idea and it was a really good one. The big puffy loaves don’t make nice croûtons but a dense loaf is just right.

*My hands just aren’t what they used to be and I can’t knead the dough, so I use my heavy duty mixer. It’s a Kenwood (an English product), not a Kitchen Aid, but it works every bit as good and cost a fraction. I bought it about 1994 and didn’t want a Whirlpool product, because at that time they were contributing to Planned Parenthood (but not anymore, as I understand it). Here‘s a more current list.

This post is linked to:
Food on Fridays @ Ann Kroeker.
Frugal Fridays@Life as Mom

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Filed under Baking, Food, Hints, Home, Recipes, Thrift, Thrift

Annus horribilis?


Last night I couldn’t get to sleep until after 4 a.m. due to several things; the least of which was having had an afternoon nap and drinking tea with supper.

The big reason was thinking about the past year. (WordPress started the new date at 6:00 p.m. CST, but today is actually still January 26.) One year ago today I coughed up a handful of blood. Twice.

When Joe got home from work he took me to a Care Now clinic, where they did a chest x-ray. I fully expected the doctor to say that I had pneumonia (again) or at the worst, TB. I was not expecting him to be so gentle and concerned after he looked at the x-ray. And I certainly didn’t expect him to tell me that it was probably a lung tumor. Which it was.

He had his staff make an appointment for me to have a CAT scan the next day. After we got back home that night, I looked up lung tumors on some reliable websites (like webmd.com). For the symptoms I had, the news was not good. Normally about 6 months to live. To say I was in shock for about 3 days puts it mildly.

Then there was the hurry up and wait tests and doctors appointments over the next month and surgery on Feb. 25. They all wanted to tell me that this was going to be major surgery and recovery would be tough, and just exactly what they were going to do. I didn’t want to hear any of that because … well, at that point, what could I do about any of it? Having the information was not really helpful.

And it was awful. Really awful. There were times I thought I was dying. In fact, one of our friends who came to see me told me much later that she thought that I actually was dying. I was in the hospital almost 2 weeks, most of it in intensive care. Then the very physically painful ride home that night. We had to stop mid-way for me to take more narcotics just to make it home.

Bleeding from the 2 drain holes grew worse until it was critical for me to get back to the hospital emergency room. I was re-admitted and had another drain tube inserted and almost another week in the hospital; again, most of it in intensive care. Texas turned from winter to spring while I was there.

Those weeks I think of as The Black Hole.

And then, months of recovery at home. Months and months of it. It was many weeks until I was out of pajamas or a nightgown or able to do anything.

One of the real blessings at this time was that Joe’s employer allowed him to work “from home”, which meant my hospital room (because Baylor Grapevine has wi-fi), then from our home for about another month.

Diagnosis of the pathology took one month to get back from the Mayo clinic. They said it was a rare sarcoma called an epithelioid leiomyosarcoma. Malignant but completely gone because that lobe of my lung had been removed. My oncologist wanted to be certain, and referred me to M.D. Anderson. After a Keystone Kops fiasco (except that it really wasn’t funny) they tested the sample for a couple of hours and said “no, it wasn’t”. They didn’t know what it was, weren’t interested and refused my doctor’s referral to them. We’re still not sure what it was, but we hope that it’s still gone. Periodic CAT and PET scans and chest x-rays are done to keep an eye on it.

So, we went to Vanderbilt in Nashville. They looked at it for about the same amount of time and said the same thing as Anderson, but were much, much nicer about it. And there was that lovely trip to Nashville. What a beautiful city.

I joked at the time that it’s a tough year when vacation consists of a 2 day trip to a cancer hospital. Little did I know that that trip was to be about the only recreational time we’d have all year.

Around the first of August, our daughter-in-law (who is separated from our son) took our grandsons to Colorado for vacation. I had a bad feeling about it – that she wasn’t coming back. And she didn’t.

Sept. 19, she called and said that she couldn’t take care of them and would we come and get them and take care of them for the rest of the year. We left for Colorado within 2 hours. The details of what we learned on that trip are very personal and I won’t go into them, but we decided that it was in the best interest of the boys to sue for custody.

So, Joe withdrew money from his retirement account for us to retain an attorney and we filed papers with the court. Twice we went to court, only to be told that continuances had been granted. Then there were the depositions.

I knew nothing about depositions before all this, but they are horrible, horrible things. Our DIL’s was first. The tension was so awful; I was sick all afternoon.

But her deposition was nothing compared to mine. They were both 3 hours of questioning but the difference was the demeanor of the attorneys. Ours was a gentleman who was quite respectful to DIL.

Never mind that our DIL’s family has lots of $$$. She was represented by an attorney from an agency supported by the United Way – for free. Remember that the next time your employer puts the pressure on you to contribute.

Her jackboot, feminist lawyer skewered me for 3 hours and wanted more. My incision was beginning to really hurt by the end and I said ‘no more’. She complained that I hadn’t answered the questions, was evasive and hostile (or something like that).

Well, yes. I was. In fact, I wish now that I had been less cooperative than I was.

The rules are that they can ask any question they want. Our attorney could only object to the form of the question, not the questions themselves. And they were really invasive.

“How much money is in your checking account? In your savings account? How much does your husband make? What did you spend on groceries last month? Where did your son meet his girlfriend? Where does she work? How much money does your son earn?” ad nauseum. And much, much worse. Lots of questions of the “did you quit beating your husband?” type. And those are not nearly the worst ones. She was very hostile. She must watch all those courtroom shows on television because that’s how she really acted.

When we first went in and sat down at the table, I could see that she had printed off some of the posts from this blog, which she used against me: A Wonderful Day and Prodigal Sons. She was particularly vicious about Prodigal Sons, asking if I was such a lousy parent what made me think I could raise someone else’s children.

Texas law sets a very high bar on proving an unfit mother, and without paying for the witnesses to come from Colorado, we couldn’t prove our case.

So, on Dec. 8 it broke our hearts to have to turn the children back over.

Christmas was not much fun but we put up a tree and decorated for them anyway. Amazingly enough, DIL still allows them to visit occasionally. And we are really thankful for that.

2010 was the year of the major health crisis, the recovery, the custody issues, the death of 2 close friends, financial troubles, 2 relationship breakups in the family, and it ended with my 96 year-old mother being hospitalized for pneumonia and helping to make the decision to take her off of the treatment (in keeping with the directives she wrote in a living will she had written years ago). And the death of two of our beloved cats. Not that that in any way compares to the other issues, but this loss was also stressful.

The Good News?

Our faith remains strong. The Lord Jesus sustains us.

We still get to see our grandsons.

Our family is intact.

The 2 friends that we lost will be waiting in heaven and we’ll see them again.

Finances are really tight, but the medical bills are paid.

My doctors were very good and the nursing staff at Baylor Grapevine was excellent. Especially in ICU.

Even though there are residual physical problems, I am able to function much more normally than I had expected.

My loving husband was able to be with me every single day in the hospital and cared for me at home for a month. In all that time, he only had to use less than 2 days of vacation time and even completed an extra project for the client.

We have food, shelter and clothing. And I’m so glad I saved those clothes that I outgrew a few years ago, because when I lost nearly 50 pounds after the surgery, my things didn’t fit anymore. It’s a rotten way to lose weight, but it is a compensation and I’m glad of it.

And it’s absolutely amazing: my mother seems to be recovering!

I really hope that we have learned what the Lord wanted us to learn in all this, that our sorrows were not wasted, and that we are stronger.

Praise God, for His mercy endures forever.

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Filed under Faith, Vicissitudes of Life

Mini Altered Book

My sister is an uncommonly thoughtful gift-giver. As a small Thank You, I made this little altered book for her a couple of years ago.
The F is for Fran and the running themes throughout the little book are the Christian faith and cats. Using black acrylic paint, I stenciled an F onto a piece of bookpage, then used a Sharpie to outline it with dashed lines. After gluing it onto cardstock, I distressed the edges in pink, as well as the edges of the whole cover. The kitties are stamped and are repeated on the back cover.


Backgrounds: magazine clipping and book page
Embellishments
Calendar – the Scripture
Magazine clippings – house, jewelry and butterfly; the stylized heart was cut out from a James Avery jewelry catalog
Stamped – the little heart, glittered swirl, girl’s face and clock
Photocopies – 1950’s girls were reduced from an old dress pattern
Sticker – cat
Misc. – swirls from a mini punch, daisies from a glitter set, vellum from a junk mail envelope, canceled postage stamp, colored paperclips

Here again, magazine pages were used for the backgrounds, as well as part of an old book page. The F was cut from a map in an old Book of Knowledge and glued onto cereal box chipboard; the pansies were from a stationery package.
Calendar – Scripture
Photocopy – little girl
Old greeting card – bird


Magazine – back of F, teapot
Stamping – cat
Calendar – Scripture
Misc. – canceled postage stamp


Magazine – Twinings tea ad, keys, cat, coffee cup
Calendar – Scripture
Sticker – cat with feathered hat


Backgrounds – jewelry/flowers from magazine; bookpage, and red cellophane from Valentine candy box
Magazine – 1950s Harlequin glasses, flower, ruby slippers, key
Catalog – jewelry from James Avery, then glittered
Stamping – You’re the cat’s meow!
Misc. – paper strip cut with decorative scissors, glitter, Kansas from Book of Knowledge


Backgrounds – gardening pages from magazine
Calendar – Scripture
Sticker – butterfly
Magazine clippings – basket of flowers, Attracting Birds and Butterflies, teapot
Stamping – cat
Misc. – canceled postage stamps


Backgrounds: magazine pages with jewelry,
Catalog – cross from James Avery, stylized flower from Avon book
Fabric – blue gingham ribbon, pinked edge drapery sample
Sticker – cat
Stamping – Everday is another chance to make your Dreams come true.
Misc. – plastic flowers, flower from old book, teapot from Bigelow tea box


Background – pink cardstock
Stamping – little girl praying, kitties
Misc. – colored paper clips, pink polka dot ribbon for binding

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Filed under Altered Books, Book Page Projects, Cats, Crafts - Cheap, Crafts - Paper, Ephemera, Faith, Free, Scripture, Thrift, Using What You Have

New Curtains

This morning I’ve renewed my efforts to do something different for our kitchen windows. For several years the kitchen theme has been a red/white/green cheerful, kind of a 40’s look. Red rick-rack and all that.

But then, as women do, I started thinking about something different. Although not something so different that would require wall painting, etc. Not that there’s anything wrong with that – the kitchen could certainly do with a new coat of paint, but I just can’t face packing up everything and all the rest of it that goes with a painting project.

So, I’m going to be contented (for now) with new curtains, potholders, and a few other things.

Our dining table was the one that my parents bought in 1965 from a discount furniture place in Tulsa. Can you imagine yourself 46 years from now still using a table from a discount place?

I guess they don’t even make discount furniture like they used to.

Anyway, the table (which you may have seen in some of my photos under some of my projects) has a brown, woodgrain formica top with a house and trees painted in 2 opposite corners. The accent paint color is kind of an aqua.

Then our son’s girlfriend gave me a cat and fish wind chime for Christmas, which is Very nice and she really shouldn’t have spent that much money. But it is nice and I really like it. The colors are the same as in the table. So the blue/green/aqua colors of the mid-60s are what I’m going with for the new look.

To fit in with my “Using What You Have” thoughts for this year, the curtain fabric is some that my sister gave me.

Now, Don’t have a cow: it’s fleece.

I know, I know. Fleece just isn’t curtain fabric. But it is in my house.

Our kitchen windows are on the south with no shade, which is nice in January, but not in Texas in August. And the window shades just weren’t very effective, besides which, they’re shot.

My sister pointed out that fleece is too bulky to make the rod pocket, and I don’t want to do tabs, because that would let light in around the tops and I’d have to buy new curtain rods (or come up with something else), so….

I’m hand printing/stenciling cats and coffee cups in green and turquoise on a piece of old sheeting to add to the tops for rod pockets. One thing I’ve learned with using acrylic paint for fabric painting: it helps to thin it a little bit with water, but not too much. I had too much water in the mix and then had to add more paint. But with it thinned a little it helps it to look more like fabric dye than gloppy paint. I tend to buy only basic colors, so I had green, but not the turquoise. For it, I mixed the green with some dark blue, then a little white to lighten it. Amazingly enough (thank you, Lord!), it is exactly the color of the fleece.

Yesterday I tried sewing a patchwork top on, but it just didn’t look right.

We’ll see how the hand printed fabric turns out.

So far, so good.

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Filed under Crafts - Cheap, Free, Home, Kitchens, Making Do, Thrift, Thrift, Using What You Have

1965 Hairstyles: How To (Part II)

Other 1965 posts:

1965 Hairstyles How To (Part I)

1965 Hats, Shoes, Purses, & Gloves

1965 Junior Fashions
1965 Junior Fashions
Maternity Clothes, 1960 – 1972
1965 – prices, movies, books, music, television, toys, ads & more

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1965 Hairstyles How To (Part I)


Yesterday I mentioned that the “Gidget” television show was filmed in 1965 and these styles are of course from the same time. Remember how Sally Field’s hair was never the same style from one scene to the next?

Here are a couple of styles and the instructions for how to get them from the January 1965 issue of Seventeen magazine.

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