1965 Hairstyles: How To (Part II)

Other 1965 posts:

1965 Hairstyles How To (Part I)

1965 Hats, Shoes, Purses, & Gloves

1965 Junior Fashions
1965 Junior Fashions
Maternity Clothes, 1960 – 1972
1965 – prices, movies, books, music, television, toys, ads & more

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under Hairstyles

4 responses to “1965 Hairstyles: How To (Part II)

  1. Carla — I think you are right that those of us who were teenagers in the 60’s (I graduated in ’64) really were blessed with the styles of clothes and hair that were popular. I think I probably tried just about all of these styles at one time or another — me and Sally Fields. 🙂

  2. Sandra, I thought the early and mid-60s were a great time to be young. It was a time of fun music and fun fashions and it was before all that self-centered silliness of the late 60s era.

    I graduated in 1972 and the styles (like almost EVERTYTHING else in the 70s) were mostly … well… just plain awful.

    So you gals who were teenagers in the early and mid-60s were really blessed!

    Those were some of the best years of my life.

  3. Good tip about the thinning of acrylic paint before using on fabric 🙂

    I used a stencil and fabric paint to print a pattern on white cotton to line a bag I made a couple of months ago (post titled ‘Bags of Bags, Round 4); and while the fabric paint didn’t need thinning, I had to make sure that the brush was not too loaded with paint otherwise splodges were inevitably going to happen.

    • Yes, I have to be careful about not having too much paint on the brush, too. Usually, I use a stippling brush, but this this I just used a flat paintbrush (one for using with oils or acrylics) because it was already being employed for brushing the paint onto the sponge stamp. After loading the paint, I just kept brushing on newspaper until most of it was gone. On a different project I had thinned the paint down when using the foam stamps and after it dried, it had the look of having been dyed rather than painted.

      Thanks for visiting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s