Monthly Archives: May 2011

Tim Hawkins Comedy

The Things You Don’t Say To Your Wife

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Filed under Fun, Humor, YouTube

Does the Flour Make a Difference?

Frankly, I never thought so until a couple of months ago. I thought that flour was flour. Although I didn’t really trust the store brands (except for Sam’s Club), I honestly thought that the type or brand didn’t matter. Usually, we just buy the 25 pound sacks of the Baker’s Secret (store brand) all-purpose flour at Sam’s and use it for everything from bread to cake to cookies, and the results are usually pretty tasty. But then I started thinking …

The first time I’d ever heard of King Arthur was when looking through one of those dreamy-wish-book-kitchen-catalogs. I don’t remember how much it cost, but it was pretty pricey. Then a few weeks ago, I saw their bread flour on the shelf at Wal-Mart for about $3.15, so I decided to try it.

Using the same recipe that we’ve used for years, suddenly the crust was really good. I mean really good. In fact, it was the best pizza I’ve ever made. And I used it for my Country White Loaf and it was noticeably better.


This week I bought a box of Swan’s Down Cake Flour.

What I’m expecting is a really lovely cake.

Founded in 1790, King Arthur is America’s oldest bread company. In 1996, it became employee owned and is headquartered in New England.

For more information on King Arthur –
general information: go here,
company history: go here,
baking blogs: go here,
recipes (including gluten-free): go here.

Swans Down has been around since 1894. For recipes on their website, go here.
This page has a pdf link for “Six Steps for Baking Success.”

So, to answer my own query: Yes. It does.

This post is linked to Food on Fridays @ AnnKroeker.com

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Filed under Baking, Food, Made in the U.S.A.

Guess Who I Saw at the Grocery Store?

Hulda, Grace and Sophia Quebe (photo from their website)

On Sunday afternoon, Joe and I ran in Central Market to pick up a few things for a cookout at our son’s. It’s always (always) crowded in there and as I was threading in and out of customers in the produce department, I noticed a young woman and her mother (I think).

The first thing I noticed was that they looked like they’d just come from church, which is a little unusual for C.M. customers. Usually they look like they’ve just left the country club or the museum or something highbrow, so it was really nice to see ladies in church clothes. (Yes, yes. I know. I came of age in the early 70s and I know you can go to church in something other than dress clothes. But the older I get, the more traditional I get and the more I understand my mother.)

Very quickly after noticing their clothes (and remember this is only seeing them from behind), I noticed the younger woman’s hair. It was really beautiful. Probably long, and put up, but not an up-do. Kind of a roll or something but it was very unusual.

Then I hurried on to the fish counter to get a piece of salmon cut. As I was turning to put it into my basket, I looked up and saw the mother and daughter again – and I recognized her!

I said “Are you a Quebe?”

She smiled very sweetly and said “Yes”. Her mother smiled, too. If I had a daughter like her, I’d be grinning from ear to ear.

So, then I acted like a typical starstruck fan and gushed and told her how much we enjoyed their music and watched them on youtube, etc.

And I told her that their version of that Ray Charles song (the title having slipped my mind) was my favorite version. She said “Georgia On My Mind”. Yes! Of course.

Who are the Quebes? Go here for their website (and a link to their performance schedule).

They are a fantastic sister trio who play fiddles and sing. We first learned of them from an article in the Texas Power Co-op magazine.

She told me that they’re playing at the Levitt Auditorium in Arlington (Texas) next Saturday night – May 28th. It’s an outdoor event and free.

And you know how people sometimes look a little different in person than they do in photos?

Hulda is even prettier in person.

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Filed under 1970s, Events & Museums, Femininity, Internet links, Music, Texas

Note to Self

Always have postage stamps on hand that can be sent for serious business. Dennis the Menace and cute kittens may be fun, but aren’t appropriate for all correspondence, such as Thank You notes for funeral flowers.

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You Tube Cat Humor

Lately I’ve been having trouble with wordpress allowing me to insert photographs, and it’s a little boring to do very many posts without them, so for now, I’m just going to insert some fun and/or interesting youtube videos that I’ve found.


This first one was posted by a friend on Facebook. Thanks Johnny.


And here’s the latest Simon’s Cat.

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Filed under Cats, Humor, YouTube

Where I am

I’ll continue to take a blog break until Wednesday or Thursday due to the death of my mother.

Her obituary.

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Filed under Family, Vicissitudes of Life

Graduation to Something Better


Stella Margaret Sexton Edens
August 30, 1914 ~ May 3, 2011

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Filed under Faith, Family

Nuns and Me

Sound of Music abbey



The Trouble with Angels

Where Angels Go, Trouble Follows
The Singing Nun
A Nun at the Crossroads
The Flying Nun
The Nun’s Story
Lilies of the Field
Yours, Mine and Ours
The Sound of Music
A Change of Habit
(and countless episodes of television programs when religious people were sincere and not the perps, for instance: Wanted: Dead or Alive, The Big Valley.)

My friend Mo and I were talking about the Christian faith, and she mentioned that her mother had been a nun before she married Mo’s dad (obviously it was before, but I didn’t know how else to phrase the sentence). I knew Mo had gone to Catholic school, but wow, this was a really fascinating aspect to my friend.

I told her that if I hadn’t been Southern Baptist, I would’ve become a nun. Certainly I would’ve if I’d been Catholic.

Nuns were absolutely fascinating to me as I was growing up; in fact, they still are. Women who devote their total lives to serving Jesus, whose very clothing is a constant reminder of who they are and what they are about.

Beginning in the mid-60s, my friend Carol Ford and I went to the movies together a lot. And if it had nuns in it, that was a sure thing. I even drug her to “A Nun at the Crossroads”, an Italian/Spanish film dubbed in English with very violent themes.

Sometime about midway through that list of movies at the top, Carol and I became candy stripers (teenage volunteers) at St. Francis Hospital in Tulsa. It’s the largest one in town and I was more familiar with it than the others, and well, if you’re 14 and you can’t be a nun, it just seemed the thing to do.

At least I could be around them.

Before or after duty, I would go and sit in the chapel and pray. There was such a holy atmosphere in that place and I really loved it.

In fact, I loved nearly everything about St. Francis and for someone who can’t stand anything squishy or biology or health class or science in general (and specific), that’s pretty good.

Many people I’ve known have an aversion to hospitals but I never did – until last year. After 17 days in one and all the pain and misery and lack of privacy and dignity, well … to quote Long John Silver, it “just plain gives me the shivers.”

But, nuns?

I still love nuns.

P.S. Oh, Carol who was more Assembly of God than Baptist, married a Catholic, converted, played a nun in her church’s production of The Sound of Music and sent her children to Catholic school.

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Filed under 1960's, Faith, Movies, Television