Category Archives: 1900s

Natchez, Part VII

Church buildings

Holy Family Catholic Church

St. Mary Basilica Catholic Church

St. Mary Basilica Catholic Church


We should’ve driven around the block again so I could get the name of this one. If anyone knows, please leave it in a comment.

Zion Chapel A.M.E.

First Baptist Church

Jefferson Street Methodist Church


A better view of Jefferson Street Methodist church can be seen here.

To see a photo of Temple B’nai Israel, go here. We didn’t pass by it, but I was glad to find a photo of it on Flickr.

Update:
Elodie at Shantybellum posted a photograph of Temple B’nai Israel here.

To read more about the Temple, go here.

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Filed under 1800s, 1900s, Buildings, Church Buildings, Faith, Mississippi

Happy Birthday

Happy Birthday, Oklahoma!

Statehood: November 16, 1907, 46th state

Capital City: Oklahoma City

Counties: 77

Motto: Labor omnia vincit (Labor conquers all things)

Nickname: Sooner State

Population: 3,450,654

Tree: Redbud

Flower: Misteltoe

Bird: Scissortailed-Flycatcher

Song: Oklahoma! by Rodgers and Hammerstein

(Content taken from 50 States.com/Oklahoma
and my memory.)

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Filed under 1900s, History, Oklahoma

Books Read in August, 2010


Until We Reach Home/ Lynn Austin (2008). Historical Fiction.

This Christian novel is the story of 3 young Swedish women who immigrate to the United States in 1897. Although it took about 2 chapters for me to get into the story, after that I could hardly put it down.

Highly Recommended.

The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a World of Literary Obsession/Allison Hoover Bartlett (2010). Non-Fiction.

Apparently Bartlett expanded her magazine article on book thief, John Gilkey, into a book.

Rarely do I buy books that I know nothing about. Too many times in the past I’ve been burned and ended up with something fit only for paper projects.

However, the title grabbed me. I stood in Sam’s and flipped through it. The subject matter was very intriguing to a book-lover so I bought it.

It’s a partial account of a contemporary man who very boldly steals books. And not just the run-of-the-mill books. Rare ones. Very valuable ones.

Did the author intentionally leave the readers wanting more; or was it that she just didn’t know how to end it (because the saga continues) or maybe she just didn’t know how to flesh out the story?

Gilkey is relentless and unrepentant. The Man Who Loved Books Too Much is a fascinating read, but it would’ve been helpful had Bartlett spared us her political and world views. Personally, I don’t care what she thinks.

I just wanted to know more about John Gilkey.

Recommended.

The Body in the Library/Agatha Christie (1942). Mystery.

Mrs. Bantry of Gossington Hall is awakened by her hysterical maid who has just discovered the body of a stranger on the rug downstairs. How satisfying for the Bantry’s to have Miss Marple as a close friend at such a time and so the fluffy spinster is called in to speed up the investigation.

So typically Agatha Christie and a very satisfying read.

Highly Recommended if you like cozy mysteries.

D.E. Stevenson

Celia’s House/D.E. Stevenson (1943). Fiction.

Publishers must think that book buyers judge a book by it’s cover. Nothing else explains the swill they print on them.

Celia’s House is a lovely, cozy read. The back cover of the edition I read had some utter nonsense about the younger generation trying to carry on and being at odds with their elders. There’s absolutely nothing like that in the book – at all.

It’s just a nice story set in the early part of the 20th century, about a Scottish family and their ancestral home. Of course, everyone isn’t nice. There are a couple of ne’er-do-well characters who give it a little literary tension.

I have several D.E. Stevenson paperbacks that were reprinted in the mid-70s and they have the most atrocious cover art. Here is an example of one edition of Celia’s House (not the one I read but I want to post it just as an example).

Please don't judge this book by the cover.


It was just last week that I read this book, and my memory is fresh and I don’t think a goat was ever mentioned.

Goodness.

So, ignore the cover and if you like cozy reads, this one is Highly Recommended.

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Filed under 1900s, Books, Cozy, England, Fiction