Category Archives: 1970s

Observations After a Class Reunion

1. I’m glad I went. I think.

2. I’m glad that the God of my salvation does not judge me as mere mortals see me. That my worth to Him is not appearance based, or on what kind of house I live in or my education or job or social standing.

Because all those things are not in quite as good shape as they were 40 years ago when I graduated from high school.

The group photo proves that.

Ouch.

One of my few regrets from the party is that I allowed Gayla to drag me over for the portrait.

Bit a of reality check for me.

3. A mild correction of an old problem.

Remember the kid who sat alone in the cafeteria? Much of the time, that was me.

What I’ve regretted about that, was not that the others didn’t include me in their group, but that I didn’t use the opportunity to keep someone else from being alone.

What was so great about me that I couldn’t have been the one to reach out?

So, on Saturday night when one of the guys who used to have the same problem came up and started chatting, I chatted back. He made the first attempt (which I thought very brave because we’d never known each other), and I responded. And, then, I tried to overcome my nervousness and started a few conversations, too.

4. There were a few people who’d been popular (and though not enemies, weren’t friends either) who are now friendly and welcoming and that always pleases, but shocks me.

5. And there were some who’d never spoken to me in school,and who wouldn’t even crack a smile for me on Saturday night.

Stupid, stupid, stupid that it still stings. Time to grow up, girl.

Norma Davis, me, Richard Crawford, Nicole Wright

6. How valuable kindness is. Thank you, Gayla and Shirley and Carolyn and Kathy and Don and Jim and Joanna and Ray and Mike and Alan.

7. I’m glad I went.

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Filed under 1970s, Faith, Oklahoma, Tulsa, Vicissitudes of Life

Guess Who I Saw at the Grocery Store?

Hulda, Grace and Sophia Quebe (photo from their website)

On Sunday afternoon, Joe and I ran in Central Market to pick up a few things for a cookout at our son’s. It’s always (always) crowded in there and as I was threading in and out of customers in the produce department, I noticed a young woman and her mother (I think).

The first thing I noticed was that they looked like they’d just come from church, which is a little unusual for C.M. customers. Usually they look like they’ve just left the country club or the museum or something highbrow, so it was really nice to see ladies in church clothes. (Yes, yes. I know. I came of age in the early 70s and I know you can go to church in something other than dress clothes. But the older I get, the more traditional I get and the more I understand my mother.)

Very quickly after noticing their clothes (and remember this is only seeing them from behind), I noticed the younger woman’s hair. It was really beautiful. Probably long, and put up, but not an up-do. Kind of a roll or something but it was very unusual.

Then I hurried on to the fish counter to get a piece of salmon cut. As I was turning to put it into my basket, I looked up and saw the mother and daughter again – and I recognized her!

I said “Are you a Quebe?”

She smiled very sweetly and said “Yes”. Her mother smiled, too. If I had a daughter like her, I’d be grinning from ear to ear.

So, then I acted like a typical starstruck fan and gushed and told her how much we enjoyed their music and watched them on youtube, etc.

And I told her that their version of that Ray Charles song (the title having slipped my mind) was my favorite version. She said “Georgia On My Mind”. Yes! Of course.

Who are the Quebes? Go here for their website (and a link to their performance schedule).

They are a fantastic sister trio who play fiddles and sing. We first learned of them from an article in the Texas Power Co-op magazine.

She told me that they’re playing at the Levitt Auditorium in Arlington (Texas) next Saturday night – May 28th. It’s an outdoor event and free.

And you know how people sometimes look a little different in person than they do in photos?

Hulda is even prettier in person.

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Filed under 1970s, Events & Museums, Femininity, Internet links, Music, Texas

Happy Anniversary, Darling

March 17, 1973

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Filed under 1970s, Family, Saint Patrick's Day

Maternity Clothes, 1960 – 1972

1960 Fall Winter Sears

1965 Fall Winter MW

1965 Fall Winter MW

1966 Montgomery Ward

1966 Montgomery Ward

1972 Montgomery Ward

It was 1975 when I was expecting our first child; I read everything I could get my hands on about pregnancy. All the books encouraged women to try and look their prettiest. They advised that it would help boost confidence, and I think the writers were correct.

My mother started sewing maternity clothes for me; I had the prettiest clothes of my life and more of them (she did the same thing again 5 years later when I was expecting our younger son; this time I needed winter clothes. She even made me a cape so I wouldn’t have to wear a coat that was gaping open in the front). I think it was important to her to do that for me because when she was expecting my older sister, she and my dad didn’t have much money. She said she only had two maternity dresses. She’d wear one and wash the other. Knowing my mother, I imagine she ironed them, too.

When I was choosing the tags for this post, it seemed right to check the Femininity box because that goes to the heart of why I’ve been thinking about maternity clothes. Rarely do I see expectant mothers wearing maternity clothes anymore, and even more rarely are they pretty ones. Before our first grandson was born Joe and I went to buy Anne a maternity dress and we went to about 3 stores before we found one, and even in 2003 the selection was very poor. It may be almost non-existent now.

I don’t understand this. Many of the current fashions are just plain ugly and extremely unflattering to women. However, some of the dresses I’ve seen this summer were quite pretty. So why not pretty maternity clothes?

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Filed under 1960, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1970s, Fashion, Femininity, Maternity, Montgomery Ward, Vintage catalogs