Category Archives: Antiques/Vintage

1931 Ford Pickup

Towards the far left center (as you enter through the front door) at the LoneStar Antique Mall, there sits a beautiful example of American engineering – an 1931 Ford pickup truck.

It’s displayed with some vintage looking Mobil oil signs, oil cans, etc.

Remember when they were called “service stations” and they really were full service?

“Check your oil for you?” the uniformed man would say as he was cleaning the windshield.

Sigh.

I digress. You can go here for the Wikipedia article on the 1927-1931 Ford Model A.

Because of so many other items surrounding it, I couldn’t get a good photograph of the whole truck.

If you can’t go to the LoneStar Antique Mall in Haltom City, Texas, you can go here to see a nicely restored one.

This vehicle is on my fantasy wish list.

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Filed under 1930s, Antiques/Vintage, Local Shopping, Lone Star Antique Mall, Transportation, Trucks

SimpliciTeas Tea Room

My sister asked about the closeup photograph of the daisy in my last post. It was taken during our recent visit to the LoneStar Antique Mall’s tea room, Simpliciteas.

As you can see, I ordered the half veggie sandwich/half fruit salad; Joe had the soup of the day and a roast beef sandwich.

Their fruit salad is the best I’ve ever had – anywhere. Everything fresh, nothing overripe and much more than an ordinary honeydew/cantelope mixture. There are usually 7 or more varieties of fruit served with a poppyseed dressing on the side.


Dessert for me is almost always the orange cake; can’t remember the proper name. It’s a sponge cake base with a zesty orange filling and frothy topping. The serving is large enough to share, and a bit of a stretch for just one person, unless you’re still quite hungry. (This photo was taken during a previous lunch, when I was eating alone.)


Passed this booth as we were leaving. Wish I knew the owner’s name to share with you. It’s one of my favorite booths there; she always sets up her display as a fully decorated room and it’s lovely, isn’t it?

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Filed under Antiques/Vintage, Cafes/Restaurants, Fort Worth/Dallas, Local Shopping, Lone Star Antique Mall, Tea Rooms, Texas, Texas

Old Fashioned Pie Shop

It’s almost like stepping back into the past. Time is just sort of suspended once you walk in the door.

1930s music is playing, the lady behind the counter is making pies, photos of old family picnics decorate the walls, and the candy you remember as a kid is right there on the shelf.


Fizzies

How long has it been since you’ve had a Black Cow (I didn’t even know they were still made), or an O Henry candy bar?

And candy cigarettes??? Who would’ve thought they could survive in this O-So-Politically-Correct-New Age?

My friends and I fake-smoked and ate a lot of those little abominations and get this: we understood the difference between candy and the real thing. Just as playing with all those squirt guns and cap guns didn’t lead to actual Bonnie & Clyde type criminality, “smoking” those sugar sticks didn’t result in an addiction to nicotine.

I digress.

If a really wonderful dessert is what you seek, this is it.

The Key Lime Pie may be the best I’ve ever eaten, and the Blackberry Cobbler is great, too.

Although they have seating both inside and out, I always get mine to go. The servings are generous enough to share or put some back in the fridge for later.

You won’t see a huge case full of everything – their products are handmade and fresh and therefore, limited. Kind of like you’d expect from a Mom & Pop type store because…well, that’s what it is.

The Oak Street Pie and Candy is located right next to the locally famous and original Babe’s (more on that later) on Oak Street in Roanoke. Babe’s offers nothing for dessert – unless you want some honey on your biscuit – so the Pie Company is really convenient for that after dinner sweet.

The last time I dropped in, a young mother was there with her 2 children and I heard her telling them that some of the candy was the kind she ate when she was a kid (I’m guessing in the early 1990s). We struck up a conversation and she said they lived in Flower Mound, a very nice and spanking new affluent town which is booming. However, she brings the kids to Roanoke to see that there’s a different kind of life, where things are valued for their longevity.

Roanoke has done a really marvelous job refurbishing their old town section. They’ve kept the old and the new is well integrated.

More on the rest of it later.

I wanted to begin with one of my new favorite places.

If you want to visit them online, go here. The price list is for whole pies, but they sell single servings, too. Looks like they sell boxed lunches and that a lunch menu is coming soon.

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Filed under Antiques/Vintage, Cafes/Restaurants, Food, Fort Worth/Dallas, Local Shopping, Old/Vintage, Restaurants, Roanoke, Shopping, Texas, Texas

Handbags and Gloves, 1960

The straw purses on the lower left remind me a lot of Barbie’s purse.

Suburban Shopper


My mother never carried one like that, but some of the ladies at Sheridan Road Baptist Church did, and I thought they were so glamorous.

Polka-dot gloves? I had to look twice to make sure. A girl would’ve had to have been very confident to wear something that outrageous and snazzy. Even though these are 52 years old – they’re new to me.

After having had the measles, it never occurred to me than spots on the hands could be stylish.

Images taken from the Spring/Summer Montgomery Ward Catalog, 1960
and
Barbie – Four Decades of Fashion, Fantasy, and Fun by Marco Tosa

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Filed under 1960's, Antiques/Vintage, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Gloves, Montgomery Ward, Purses, Shoes, Vintage Barbie, Vintage catalogs

How women in 1960 achieved The Look

To achieve the bouffant looking skirt, like this:

$12.98

a girl would have to wear one or more of these:

or these:

However, it took something a bit more stringent for this look:

Sunback Sheath Dress – $7.98

or this one:

3 Piece suit – $22.98, Red Checked Beret – $2.98

One of these was required:

Girdles

The bouffant look was the easiest to achieve – you just needed a really full half slip. More if you could. These slips were called crinolines or, as we called them in Oklahoma: Can-Cans.

They were sold in tubes and would expand like a rubber dinghy when removed.

One girl could fill a whole seat on the schoolbus if she’d really gone all out. A friend of my sister wore a cancan made by her mother which had used 12 yards of netting.

Slips were a lovely, feminine part of a lady’s wardrobe. Montgomery Ward’s 1960 Spring/Summer catalog featured 10 pages of all sorts of slips: half, full, lacy, utilitarian, and maternity in a wide range of colors.

Years ago I bought a very nice half slip with a wide border of lace, but alas, it became as tattered as a flag left out in the wind.

When I went back to Dillard’s to get a replacement – they had one style. One. And it was ugly.

I’m afraid modern women have been sold a bill of goods (taken for a ride; cheated; swindled) by fashion setters. It’s not easy to find feminine designs.

However, a Lady of the Night no longer needs a speciality store. She can get her work clothes anywhere.

Ahem.

Okay, on to the girdles.

Those slender skirts like Audrey Hepburn wore needed something more than just a slip underneath.

A “foundation garment” was used to slim those hips. Smooth out those bumps. Hold in that tummy.

That same MW catalog had 25 pages of girdles and slimming undergarments.

25!

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Filed under 1960, Antiques/Vintage, Clothing, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Vintage catalogs

1960 Party Dresses

$21.98

$19.98, $18.98

$15.84, $18.98

$19.98

$16.98, $19.98

For a timeline perspective, think of Ricky Nelson’s girlfriends on Ozzie and Harriet.

Described as Bouffant, these dresses were towards the end of the New Look style of very full skirts introduced by Christian Dior in 1947.

Thirteen years is really quite a long run for one particular style. In fact, I can’t remember any other style that has been popular as long.

As to the prices, what would $19.98 be in 2012 dollars?

Go here for more specific information, but the list below will provide a brief comparison.

In 1960 a new house cost $12,700. Median price in 2012: $235,700.

A gallon of gas was 25 cents, then. Gas this week: $3.32.

In 1960 the average cost of new car was $2,600.00. Average cost of a new car in April 2012: a whopping $30,748. This is an all-time record.

Kraft Miracle Whip 51 cents Maryland 1960. Current price is about $3.00.

Jello 35 cents for 4 pks Maryland 1960. Don’t know on this one because I don’t buy Jello.

Del Monte Peaches 29 cents per can in 1960. Seems like they’re about $1.29 now.

Fresh Eggs 49 cents per dozen Maryland 1960. Just paid about 2.50 for free range.

Land O Lakes Butter 67 cents per pound Maryland 1960

Corn 6 for 25 cents Florida 1960.

Pack of chewing gum 5 cents Maryland 1960.

Pork Chops 59 cents per pound Maryland 1960.

The average house is 20X more costly, but that might not be a fair comparison because houses are bigger and grander (though not better built).

Gasoline is probably a good one to compare; it’s current price is about 13 or 14 times what it was in 1960.

So, let’s take the lower inflation rate of 13X the 1960 costs.

That $19.98 dress would have a price tag of $259.74.

Oh, my. That doesn’t include new shoes, purse, or jewelry.

But aren’t they cute? And so lovely swirling around on the dance floor.

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Filed under 1960, Antiques/Vintage, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Vintage catalogs

1960 Ladies’ Fashions

From the 1960 Spring and Summer Montgomery Ward catalog.

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Filed under 1960, Antiques/Vintage, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Springtime, Summer, Vintage catalogs

Beatitudes Tea Room

When we’re out, my husband is quick to notice any Chinese, Thai, Indian or Barbeque restaurant.

Not really my cup of tea.

In fact, the businesses that catch my attention are antique malls, thrift stores, bookshops and tea rooms.

So, I was delighted when I spotted a new one: Beatitudes, one block off Main in downtown Grapevine, Texas.


A few days later I was reading the November/December issue of Tea in Texas, a free magazine available in many tea rooms across the state, and saw this article about Beatitudes.

So the next time my friend, Mo, and I were out at lunch time, we decided to give it a try.


We chose the Victorian dining room because I was very tired that day and the chairs seemed a bit more comfortable.

Next time – and I do plan on several next times there – I’d like to have lunch in the Country dining room. Very cottagey. (Spell check is going crazy with that word, but it gets the point across.)

As you can see, the decor is lovely, the atmosphere is serene.

The food was quite good. Complimentary appetizers were small scones and flavored butter.

I ordered the veggie sandwich and it wasn’t at all what I expected, but it was absolutely delicious.

For dessert, I had coconut cream pie, which was warm and it was some of the best I’ve ever had.

The shop offers a variety of Faith based gifts and vintage china.

So, if you find yourself in Grapevine near lunchtime (or breakfast), please give this Christ-centered business a try.

Here is their website.

Go here for the menu.

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Filed under Antiques/Vintage, Faith, Food, Grapevine, Internet links, Local Shopping, Tea, Texas, Texas

Vintage Teacher Valentine

Can’t tell for sure, but this one looks like late 30s or early 40s (the teacher’s hairstyle, the girls dress and the children’s hair).

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Filed under 1930s, 1940s, Antiques/Vintage, Ephemera, Valentine's Day

Vintage Valentine with a Horse

Though it’s not dated (I’ve never even seen a date on a vintage valentine), this one looks to be from the 1940s or early 50s, judging from the style of the little boy’s shirt.

I sincerely hope that Reed and Lucy grew up to have happy and fulfilled lives.

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Filed under 1940s, 1950s, Antiques/Vintage, Children, Ephemera, Valentine's Day