Category Archives: Children’s

Fun with Dick and Jane, part V, Toys

These pages are from the Basic Reader “Fun with Dick and Jane”, by William S. Gray and May Hill Arbuthnot. Illustrated by Eleanor Campbell and Keith Ward. Scott, Foresman and Company, 1946.

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Filed under 1946, Antiques/Vintage, Children's, Ephemera, Vintage Textbooks

Fun With Dick and Jane, part IV, Toys

These pages are from the Basic Reader “Fun with Dick and Jane”, by William S. Gray and May Hill Arbuthnot. Illustrated by Eleanor Campbell and Keith Ward. Scott, Foresman and Company, 1946.

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Filed under 1946, Antiques/Vintage, Books, Children's, Ephemera, Vintage Textbooks

Fun with Dick and Jane, part III, Transportation

These pages are from the Basic Reader “Fun with Dick and Jane”, by William S. Gray and May Hill Arbuthnot. Illustrated by Eleanor Campbell and Keith Ward. Scott, Foresman and Company, 1946.

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Fun with Dick and Jane, part III, Animals

Little Quack

Little Rabbit

Puff

Spot

These pages are from the Basic Reader “Fun with Dick and Jane”, by William S. Gray and May Hill Arbuthnot. Illustrated by Eleanor Campbell and Keith Ward. Scott, Foresman and Company, 1946.

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Filed under 1946, Antiques/Vintage, Books, Children's, Ephemera, Vintage Textbooks

Fun with Dick and Jane, part II, Animals

These pages are from the Basic Reader “Fun with Dick and Jane”, by William S. Gray and May Hill Arbuthnot. Illustrated by Eleanor Campbell and Keith Ward. Scott, Foresman and Company, 1946.

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Filed under 1940s, 1946, Antiques/Vintage, Books, Children, Children's, Ephemera, Vintage Textbooks

Fun with Dick and Jane, part I

Basic Readers 1946-47 Edition

These pages are from the Basic Reader “Fun with Dick and Jane”, by William S. Gray and May Hill Arbuthnot. Illustrated by Eleanor Campbell and Keith Ward. Scott, Foresman and Company, 1946.

As you can see, the book is well worn from lots of 6 year old hands. I can’t afford the really good copies (the last time I even saw one in an antique mall it was $90.00).

But that’s okay, I actually enjoy used books – the idea that this book was read and maybe loved before I acquired it is nice.

Dick and Jane stories were the staple of early reading in the 1930s – 1960s. Attractive, colorful illustrations and simple story lines – lovely Americana.

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Filed under 1940s, 1946, Antiques/Vintage, Books, Children, Children's, Ephemera

While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks

The handwritten notes in the upper corner are Joe’s, probably organ settings from a long ago Christmas program at church.
(Click to enlarge and make the image clearer.)

[Page taken from A Wreath of Carols, 47 Christmas Songs Selected and Edited by Betty M. Own and Mary E. Macewen, Piano arrangements and guitar chords by Carla Bley and Mike Mantler, Illustrated by Paul Granger; published by Scholastic Book Serivces, 1966]

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Filed under 1966, Antiques/Vintage, Books, Children's, Christmas, Music, Printed, Vintage Christmas

Peg

Peg
Isn’t she lovely?

I bought her a few years ago from an ebay seller. After buying other paper dolls from her, I wrote her inquiring about odd lots, incomplete sets, even dolls without clothes and vice versa.

This 1940s girl was one of those purchases.

Very sweet and I just love her shoes.


As near as I can tell, Peg is what’s written on the back of the doll.

Was that the name of the doll, the little girl she belonged to, or both?

Save

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Filed under 1940s, Antiques/Vintage, Childhood pastimes, Children's, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Paper Dolls

Books Read, March – July, 2011

To catch up my reading list, the books below are listed by type, rather than by the month in which they were read.

(I’ll update it as I remember other titles – or find my list).

Mystery
Death of a Maid – M.C. Beaton, 2007
Death of a Dentist – M.C. Beaton 1997
Small Town Secrets – Sharon Mignerey, 2006


World War II

Non-Fiction
Entertaining Eric – Maureen Wells, published 2008; written 1940s
Notes to My Daughter – A Father’s Blitz Diary – Alexander Pierce, published 2010; written 1934+

Fiction
While We’re Far Apart – Lynn Austin, 2010
Henrietta’s War – Joyce Dennys,
The Devil’s Arithmetic, Jane Yolen, 1990


Early 20th Century Memoirs

A Vicarage Family – Noel Streatfeild, 1963
A Lucky Number – Vera Henry, 1957
Half-Broke Horses – Jeanette Walls, 2009

Cozy Fiction
Mrs. Tim of the Regiment – D.E. Stevenson, 1932
Kate Hardy – D.E. Stevenson, 1947
Summerhills – D.E. Stevenson, 1956
The Young Clementina (alternate titles: Divorced from Reality/Miss Dean’s Dilemma) – D.E. Stevenson, 1935

General Fiction
Joshua ~ a Parable for Today – Joseph F. Girzone, 1983
The Wetherbys – G. Clifton Wisler, 1992
Made in the U.S.A. – Billie Letts, 2008
One Second After – William Forstchen, 2009
A Promise for Ellie – Lauraine Snelling, 2006

General Non-Fiction
In the President’s Secret Service – Ronald Kessler, 2010
The World According to Beaver – Irwyn Applebaum, 1984
Among Schoolchildren – Tracey Kidder, 1990
Venus~the Dark Side- Roy Sheppard Mary T. Cleary, 2008

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Books Read in March, 2011

Heaven Is For Real/Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent (2010). A slim volume and an easy read, Heave Is For Real was a pleasure. Even though I’ve been a Christian almost all of my life and I know I’ll go to be with Jesus when I die, I’ve never pondered much about what heaven will be like. Four-year-old Colton Burpo relates his experiences and what he saw in heaven over a period of time, rather than immediately upon his recovery from his illness. Here is their website .

This book was a huge encouragement to me.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven: A Remarkable Account of Miracles,Angels and Life Beyond this World/Kevin Malarkey and Alex Malarkey(2010). Another book about a young boy who has experienced heaven and came back to tell. It’s a little more painful to read because of the father’s guilt (his distraction and unfamiliarity with a dangerous intersection led to the car accident which severely injured his son). Go here to their website.

God bless this courageous boy and his family!

RECOMMENDED

The House at World’s End,/Monica Dickens (1970). Miss Dickens is the great-grandaughter of that other Dickens we all know, Charles. It’s not fair to compare the descendants of a genius (and I do believe that C.D. was truly a genius), so I won’t. Maybe her other books are better, and I will give them a try, but this one was just a story to frame the message about not being cruel to animals. And that is a worthy cause and one that I support, but somehow it just comes across more as a sermon than a good story.

This is the tale of a family of children who are pretty much left on their own after their house burns, their mother has a long hospitalization from burns she received, an uncle who only nominally looks after them and a father who would rather sail around the world than take care of his family.

My family and I have adopted many homeless animals over the years, so I understand Miss Dickens’ dedication to alleviate suffering; I just wish she’d written a better book for the cause.

Incidentally, The House At World’s End is juvenile fiction, but I wouldn’t recommend it to sensitive children. There were a few descriptive passages that I had to skip. Maybe tougher kids won’t have a problem with those scenes, but I would never have been able to handle them as a child.

It isn’t boring and it’s not a terrible book; I just think it could’ve been better.

RECOMMENDED WITH RESERVATIONS

How Starbucks Saved My Life/Michael Gill (2007). The title grabbed me, so I read it. And it is interesting but … it’s just a little creepy because Mr. Gill worships Starbucks (and I’m not kidding). He was a down and out Madison Avenue (advertising business) executive who lost his job, and then his family (due to unfaithfulness) and got a job making coffee. It’s true, in his earlier years he led an interesting life and perhaps he used this framework to tell it. He’s met a lot of famous people, from Frank Sinatra to Frank Lloyd Wright to Queen Elizabeth. But his obsequious fawning just came across as sad to me; Starbucks is not a fit religion. Maybe Starbucks did save his life, but it won’t save his soul.

NOT RECOMMENDED

(This is not the complete account of what I read during March, but I had to rely on my memory. That may not be such a good thing because my memory has failed to tell me where I left the list of books. When I find it, I’ll do an update.)

Partially Read and intend to finish:
The Last Mrs. Astor

The Friendly Dickens

The Book of Awesome

Witness, Whitaker Chambers.

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