Category Archives: Fashion

Fashions, 1967

1967 was a fun year of fashion and had some really cute styles for teenagers.

Original caption:

“Confectionery Colors, this page, glow out to play all summer. Left: Trim T-shirt, about $8, crinkled over a ribbed A-liner, about $11. Center: Baby Beachdress, about $17. (See undercover notes on page 236.) Right: Swimsuit with its crinkle on the blouson side, about $18. Pakula earrings. All cotton fabrics by Halpern. Fashions are by Cole of California.”

The notes on page 236 were on what to wear underneath the spaghetti strapped dress.

My, how times have changed. Foundational garments, indeed.

Very often the tops that went with the hip-hugger skirts were ribbed knit material. I loved that look.

The mid-teen girls wore this style and I remember how cool they looked. I think I had one dress with the hip-hugger and wide belt look. And of course the baby doll style was quite popular in swimsuits, nightwear and dresses.

*Photograph and caption taken from the April 1967 issue of Seventeen Magazine.

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Filed under 1960's, 1967, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Summer, Swimwear, Vintage Magazines

Swimwear for Girls, Teens and Ladies, 1960

for teens

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Sub-Teens

for Girls

Notice anything unusual, compared to the current selections ~ I mean, apart from how naked they aren’t?

The catalog featured 1 – just one – swimsuit for Teens and 2 full pages for Ladies.

And the group that are called Pre-Teens now were “Sub-Teens”. There are all kinds of jokes to be made from that, but I’ll let it go for now.

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Filed under 1960, Ephemera, Fashion, Montgomery Ward, Summer, Vintage catalogs

Ladies’ Hats, 1960

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Filed under 1960, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Hats, Montgomery Ward, Vintage catalogs

Handbags and Gloves, 1960

The straw purses on the lower left remind me a lot of Barbie’s purse.

Suburban Shopper


My mother never carried one like that, but some of the ladies at Sheridan Road Baptist Church did, and I thought they were so glamorous.

Polka-dot gloves? I had to look twice to make sure. A girl would’ve had to have been very confident to wear something that outrageous and snazzy. Even though these are 52 years old – they’re new to me.

After having had the measles, it never occurred to me than spots on the hands could be stylish.

Images taken from the Spring/Summer Montgomery Ward Catalog, 1960
and
Barbie – Four Decades of Fashion, Fantasy, and Fun by Marco Tosa

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Filed under 1960's, Antiques/Vintage, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Gloves, Montgomery Ward, Purses, Shoes, Vintage Barbie, Vintage catalogs

Shoes, 1960

High heels ~

And flats ~

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Filed under 1960's, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Purses, Shoes, Vintage catalogs

How women in 1960 achieved The Look

To achieve the bouffant looking skirt, like this:

$12.98

a girl would have to wear one or more of these:

or these:

However, it took something a bit more stringent for this look:

Sunback Sheath Dress – $7.98

or this one:

3 Piece suit – $22.98, Red Checked Beret – $2.98

One of these was required:

Girdles

The bouffant look was the easiest to achieve – you just needed a really full half slip. More if you could. These slips were called crinolines or, as we called them in Oklahoma: Can-Cans.

They were sold in tubes and would expand like a rubber dinghy when removed.

One girl could fill a whole seat on the schoolbus if she’d really gone all out. A friend of my sister wore a cancan made by her mother which had used 12 yards of netting.

Slips were a lovely, feminine part of a lady’s wardrobe. Montgomery Ward’s 1960 Spring/Summer catalog featured 10 pages of all sorts of slips: half, full, lacy, utilitarian, and maternity in a wide range of colors.

Years ago I bought a very nice half slip with a wide border of lace, but alas, it became as tattered as a flag left out in the wind.

When I went back to Dillard’s to get a replacement – they had one style. One. And it was ugly.

I’m afraid modern women have been sold a bill of goods (taken for a ride; cheated; swindled) by fashion setters. It’s not easy to find feminine designs.

However, a Lady of the Night no longer needs a speciality store. She can get her work clothes anywhere.

Ahem.

Okay, on to the girdles.

Those slender skirts like Audrey Hepburn wore needed something more than just a slip underneath.

A “foundation garment” was used to slim those hips. Smooth out those bumps. Hold in that tummy.

That same MW catalog had 25 pages of girdles and slimming undergarments.

25!

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Filed under 1960, Antiques/Vintage, Clothing, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Vintage catalogs

1960 Party Dresses

$21.98

$19.98, $18.98

$15.84, $18.98

$19.98

$16.98, $19.98

For a timeline perspective, think of Ricky Nelson’s girlfriends on Ozzie and Harriet.

Described as Bouffant, these dresses were towards the end of the New Look style of very full skirts introduced by Christian Dior in 1947.

Thirteen years is really quite a long run for one particular style. In fact, I can’t remember any other style that has been popular as long.

As to the prices, what would $19.98 be in 2012 dollars?

Go here for more specific information, but the list below will provide a brief comparison.

In 1960 a new house cost $12,700. Median price in 2012: $235,700.

A gallon of gas was 25 cents, then. Gas this week: $3.32.

In 1960 the average cost of new car was $2,600.00. Average cost of a new car in April 2012: a whopping $30,748. This is an all-time record.

Kraft Miracle Whip 51 cents Maryland 1960. Current price is about $3.00.

Jello 35 cents for 4 pks Maryland 1960. Don’t know on this one because I don’t buy Jello.

Del Monte Peaches 29 cents per can in 1960. Seems like they’re about $1.29 now.

Fresh Eggs 49 cents per dozen Maryland 1960. Just paid about 2.50 for free range.

Land O Lakes Butter 67 cents per pound Maryland 1960

Corn 6 for 25 cents Florida 1960.

Pack of chewing gum 5 cents Maryland 1960.

Pork Chops 59 cents per pound Maryland 1960.

The average house is 20X more costly, but that might not be a fair comparison because houses are bigger and grander (though not better built).

Gasoline is probably a good one to compare; it’s current price is about 13 or 14 times what it was in 1960.

So, let’s take the lower inflation rate of 13X the 1960 costs.

That $19.98 dress would have a price tag of $259.74.

Oh, my. That doesn’t include new shoes, purse, or jewelry.

But aren’t they cute? And so lovely swirling around on the dance floor.

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Filed under 1960, Antiques/Vintage, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Vintage catalogs

1960 Ladies’ Fashions

From the 1960 Spring and Summer Montgomery Ward catalog.

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Filed under 1960, Antiques/Vintage, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Springtime, Summer, Vintage catalogs

Peg

Peg
Isn’t she lovely?

I bought her a few years ago from an ebay seller. After buying other paper dolls from her, I wrote her inquiring about odd lots, incomplete sets, even dolls without clothes and vice versa.

This 1940s girl was one of those purchases.

Very sweet and I just love her shoes.


As near as I can tell, Peg is what’s written on the back of the doll.

Was that the name of the doll, the little girl she belonged to, or both?

Save

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Filed under 1940s, Antiques/Vintage, Childhood pastimes, Children's, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Paper Dolls

Dancing Jane Austen Style


(Click on image to enlarge)

The dances described in “Pride and Prejudice” are described as being glorified square dances, “in which three or more couples, the men and women in separate lines some four feet apart, facing one another, danced their way through a series of figures.

A figure was merely a sequence of movements, like those in square dances in which men and ladies opposite one another advanced and then retreated, or locked arms and swung around, or do-si-doed (from the French dos-a-dos), or wove their way through the other dancers.”

“Quadrille – Originally a card game played by four people with forty cards that was the fashionable predecessor of whist. Also, the dance that became popular in the mid-century, which had five figures, or sets of movements. It was basically a slowed-down square dance, involving four couples who started from the four points of an imaginary diamond. Even couples who started from the four points of an imaginary diamond. Even by the mid-century the dance had slowed down practically to a walk. It was used as the lead-off dance at almost all dances and balls, the waltz and the polka following.”

The Sir Roger de Coverley, although common in Dickens literature was mentioned as early as 1695. It is defined as: “A jolly type of country dance used to finish off dances and popular at Christmas. It involved the first man and last lady and last man and first lady from two lines of parallel men and women swinging out and then back, then swinging round, then weaving their way through the lines and then promenading, etc. The dance is known in the United States as the Virginia Reel.”


Excerpts are from “What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew – from Fox Hunting to Whist~the Facts of Daily Life in 19th-Century England” by Daniel Pool (1993).

The illustration of The Five Positions of Dancing is from the book “Jane Austen” by Brian Wilkes.

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Filed under 1800s, Books, Dancing, England, Fashion, History, Jane Austen, Jane Austen