Category Archives: Heros

Memorial Day 2012

To Those who faithfully served or are now serving – Thank You.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under America, Heros, Memorial Day

September 11, 2011

They were invited to Liberty Street & Church Street, New York City on September 11, 2001.

9-11-01

But they were not invited to Liberty Street & Church Street, New York City on September 11, 2011.

Photograph by Gillie Peres, in the book “World Trade Center”, by Peter Skinner (2002).

Related posts:

Never Forget

September 11, 2010

Save

Leave a comment

Filed under America, Current Events, Heros, History, New York, September 11

Happy Birthday, America!


Stunning video set to the Ray Charles version of “America”.


No audio with this one but the photos are great.


Nice trailer for 1942’s “Yankee Doodle Dandy”, which we’ll watch this afternoon as we usually do on the 4th of July. I tried to post just the Yankee Doodle Dandy scene but embedding was disabled.

So, here’s the next best thing … the dance down the White House staircase at the end –

Happy 4th!

2 Comments

Filed under 4th of July, America, Heros, Military, YouTube

George Washington Silhouette



Here’s the George Washington silhouette that I promised last February. The above tracing is from the instruction page (last photo in this post) and enlarged to 200%. The nose is not quite right. If you prefer to trace your own, click on the instruction page to enlarge it, then click again on the magnifying glass.

It’s the closest I could find to the ones that we always cut out and used for crafts back in the early 60s when I was in elementary school at Mingo.

Go here for the Lincoln silhouette outline.

One additional note: an optional background is to print off the Declaration of Independence setting the darker/lighter button much lighter than normally for the font. For an antiqued look, use a tan piece of cardstock.

These pictures are all from Holiday Touches for the Country Home, Memories in the Making Series by Leisure Arts.

3 Comments

Filed under Crafts, Crafts - Cheap, Crafts - Paper, Heros, Holidays, Using What You Have, Washington's Birthday

Cry Me a River

Monday has not been a great day.

Thomas Jefferson, on a rare snowy day in north Texas


Thomas Jefferson (our older son’s cat) is not doing well. He’s 14 years old, snuck outside about 3 weeks ago and got into a fight with something – we don’t know what. This I’m sure of, he didn’t start the fight. He’s a lover, not a fighter (by which I mean that he’s a very loving cat; he was neutered when he was young).

This morning we took him back to the vet for the third time. I don’t know if he’s going to make it and it’s breaking my heart. He has lived with Joe and me for a good part of his colorful life.

Packing up for Afghanistan deployment


When Judah was posted to Fort Drum, Joe and I took Thomas with us on the plane. Then when Judah was deployed, we went up and brought Thomas back home to Texas. He was very good on the plane; in fact, he only meowed a couple of times and I think hardly anyone even knew that we had a cat with us.

Joe and Thomas Jefferson


He was not only a very good traveler, he’s been a very good cat. We’ve had very little trouble out of him over the years. He didn’t engage in bad behavior, like some other cats I could name (LaFayette, are you listening??), and he always moved well. Most cats don’t like to move and will run off, but he has moved several times with Judah (and once with us) and he adjusted to his new home just fine, every time.

And now this. I know that pets don’t live forever but even when they live a long time, it doesn’t seem long enough. Their passing just breaks my heart. When I was in 4th grade our teacher read “Black Beauty” aloud to our class. The last chapters in the book where the horse was mistreated were devastating to me. I’ve never watched “Old Yeller”. I just can’t. (SPOILER) When I watch “My Dog Skip”, I ball like a baby; the last time I watched it (it’s a wonderful movie), I quit before the dog died.

A couple of weeks ago, Joe and I went to see “Ramona and Beezus” (which was also wonderful – and isn’t my husband a great guy to take me to a children’s movie, and not even complain? It makes that whole thing about going with him to “Lord of the Rings” not so bad). Anyway, the family in R & B has a cat, and … well, just take some kleenex in your purse.

This is just another one of those things in life that I’m not very good at … saying goodbye.

10 Comments

Filed under Books, Cats, Children's, Family, Fiction, Heros, Military, Movies, New York, Vicissitudes of Life

It’s What You Do With What You’ve Got That Counts

Sometimes I get a little behind reading my favorite blogs. I was doing a little catch-up yesterday when I discovered this poem on Sandra’s “Add Humor to Faith…mix well”.

Sandra’s mother had written a book of her own memories and at the back of it had recorded songs and poems she’d learned as a girl. This one her father had taught her and it’s a very clever play on words.

One comment on the post mentioned that children don’t seem to commit things to memory as they did in past days. My own public schooling began in 1960 and we seemed to be at the tail-end of that method of learning. We were assigned to memorize the first bit of the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution and the Gettysburg address. To my discredit, I don’t think I ever completely memorized any of these except the Preamble.

In this science fiction age of instant internet information (not all of which is accurate), some think that memorization is passe. I disagree.

My mother has been a good example to me all my life,- in the importance of memorization, as well as many other things. Even at 95, legally blind and suffering from Alzheimer’s, she’s still a good example.

She was always a great reader and I treasure that legacy from her. Sadly, her ability to comprehend started failing about the same time as her eyesight. Her memory has a lot of holes in it, but she has retained the songs and poems she learned as a child. The thieving Alzheimer’s may cloud her recognition of me at times, but she can still recite “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere” and praise God with hymns. It’s amazing and I rejoice at her memory which remains.

A pleasant childhood memory of mine, is hearing her singing hymns in her sweet soprano voice as she went about her housework. (She worked in a faded housedress and an apron because you took care of your better clothes and saved them for visiting or going to town. But the cotton work dresses and aprons were always clean and ironed.)

She was full of old sayings for every occasion. My sister recalls that they were sometimes contradictory. Mama would say “Absence makes the heart grow fonder” as well as “Out of sight, out of mind.”

The one that Mama always lived by was “It’s what you do with what you’ve got that counts.” Make the best of the situation. (I doubt she ever heard the phrase “if life gives you lemons – make lemonade” but it surely fit) Even if you don’t have what you need to do the optimum, do something; do what you can.

That attitude kept her going when her home in Kentucky was under water (up to the roof) for 2 weeks in 1937. She and her parents lost almost everything due to the severe flooding and they became homeless. She had recently married and her husband had gone to Indiana to find work. Shortly after the flood, he wrote her that he didn’t want to be married anymore. She brushed off the river mud and moved to Texas, which required a one year’s residency before filing for divorce.

She stayed with relatives until she found a job at a Mexican restaurant. A uniform was required, so she sewed her own and hand washed and ironed it every night in the room she rented. And even though the salary was only $1.00 a day + tips (and she always said that during the Depression you didn’t get many tips), her rent was $3.00 a week. After a year, she had bought new clothes, saved money and obtained her divorce and moved on to California. About 5 years later, she married my dad who had also been kicked around by life, but he had the same confidant, forward-looking attitude that she had.

So although Stella Sexton had lost all her worldly goods in the flood and was left homeless and rejected by her first husband, she didn’t spend any time feeling sorry for herself. She did what she could with what she had.

And that’s what my mother is still doing.

3 Comments

Filed under 1930s, 1937, Aging, Alzheimer's, Faith, Family, Heros, Internet links, Kentucky, Making Do, Thrift, Using What You Have, Vicissitudes of Life

American Heros

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1407952648?bctid=1664436922

This is a short film about how our wounded are transported back to the United States.

Bagran Air Force Base in Afghanistan is where our son was posted 3 years ago.

I love the American military!

2 Comments

Filed under America, Current Events, Family, Heros, Military