Category Archives: Winston Churchill

Pinterest

bum steer : False or misleading information; poor advice. For example, Gene felt his doctor had given him a bum steer, as he hadn’t lost any weight on the diet. [Slang; c. 1920]

My friend, Geneva, introduced me to Pinterest a few months ago and for goodness’ sake, I’ve certainly spent a huge amount of time there ever since.

You can click on the new sidebar button Follow Me on Pinterest and see where I’ve been spending my time instead of using it for blogging. It’s just under the Search box on the right.

One person referred to it as magazines to look at every day. For free. Lots of them. Lots and lots of them.

Here’s a short run-down on how it works:
1. If you’re interested in flowers or altered books or old barns or England or any of a zillion other things, just go to http://www.pinterest.com and type in your subject in the search bar. It will bring up photographs of whatever you typed.

2. You do not have to join in order to just view the photographs. If you want to save favorite photos that you find, then click on the red bar that says “Request an Invite”. They’ll send you an email with a confirmation and instructions on how to get started.

They give you the option of signing in with Facebook; I don’t because I think that Facebook is already far too intrusive and nosy.

3. When you find a photo that piques your interest, you click on their name to visit their Boards. Perhaps you’ll find even more common interests. Click “Follow” if you want to automatically see their new pins whenever you sign in.

4. Let’s say you’ve joined and set up your own boards and want to keep a photograph – you do this by clicking “Repin” and selecting one of your Boards to pin it to.

Here’s where the Bum Steer comes in.

I try to be very, very careful about what I Repin because there’s some bad stuff out there on the internet and it frightens me to think I might be steering someone into any of it.

That can happen because the pinned photos link back their origin.

For instance, go here to my Hats are a must! board. Then click on the photo that looks like this one:

It will take you to my blog post where the photo originated.

And most of the time, that’s okay.

However, I don’t want to steer someone to a site which will cause them to stumble; someplace that has pornography or Mormonism, or anti-Semitism or communism, or even self-destructive philosophy.

Beware: there are lots of pins that look Christian, but are not. Spiritual seduction is what they are.

When I first started, I wasn’t so careful. Then I began to consider how I’ll explain to Jesus how I’ve been the source of something which caused someone to fall into sin.

My goal isn’t to be totally bland and innocuous. I agree the Winston Churchill quote:

“You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.”

There are people who hate me (and read this blog) because of the stand I’ve taken for protection of the innocent. They are definitely not innocent themselves and have chosen their own path. If they consider themselves to be my enemy, that’s their choice.

That’s another kind of offense entirely.

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Filed under Faith, Internet links, Vicissitudes of Life, Winston Churchill

Books Read, March – December 2010

During my recovery period last spring and summer, it was really difficult to get back to all kinds of normal activity which includes reading, regular blogging and almost everything else. For nearly a month after the surgery, I virtually didn’t read. And upon resuming, I didn’t keep good records about what I’d read and when.

But as I’m trying to catch up on a bit of blog-housekeeping, here goes.

Note: The categories are general, and entries are not alphabetized. Several entries have “In progress” noted. These I hope to finish. An “Unfinished” designation means that these are ones that I probably will never finish, usually because I didn’t care for them.

So, here’s the list from March – December, 2010, to the best of my memory ( as I recall others, I’ll add them on):

FICTION

Cozy
*Changes at Fairacre, Miss Read (reread)
*Farewell to Fairacre, Miss Read (reread)
*A Peaceful Retirement, Miss Read (reread)
*Mrs. Pringle, Miss Read (reread)
*Pilgrim’s Inn, Elizabeth Goudge
*The Scent of Water, Elizabeth Goudge
*Green Dolphin Street, Elizabeth Goudge (Unfinished)
*Julia’s Hope, Leisha Kelly (reread)

General Fiction
*Charlotte and Dr. James, Guy McCrone
*The Green Years, A.J. Cronin
*So Well Remembered, James Hilton

Mystery
*The Moving Finger, Agatha Christie (reread)
*The Cat Who Wasn’t a Dog, Marian Babson
*Agatha Raisin: There Goes the Bride, M.C. Beaton
*Death of a Gentle Lady, M.C. Beaton
*Death of a Valentine, M.C. Beaton
*The Case of the Daring Decoy, Erle Stanley Gardner
*The Case of the Queenly Contestant, Erle Stanley Gardner
*The Case of the Phantom Fortune, Erle Stanley Gardner
*The Case of the Troubled Trustee, Erle Stanley Gardner (reread)
*The Case of the Footloose Doll, Erle Stanley Gardner (reread)
*The Case of the Worried Waitress, Erle Stanley Gardner (reread)

Children’s/Youth Fiction
*The Secret of Crossbone Hill, Wilson Gage

NON-FICTION

Biography and Personal Reminiscences

*An American Family, Reid Buckley
*Living it up at National Review, Priscilla Buckley
*It Gives Me Great Pleasure, Emily Kimbrough
*All of a Kind Family, Sydney Taylor
*The Sea for Breakfast, Lillian Beckwith
*Out of the Air, Mary Margaret McBride
*Mostly in Clover, Harry J. Boyle

World War II
*The Raft, Robert Trumbull
*Homefront, Norman Longmate
*The Gathering Storm, Winston Churchill (In progress)

Faith
*Loving God, Charles Colson (In progress)
*God and Man at Yale, William F. Buckley, Jr. (In progress)
*Cup of Comfort Book of Prayer: Stories and reflections that bring you closer to God,James Stuart Bell and Susan B Townsend

General Non-Fiction
*Charlotte Mason Education, Catherine Levison
*The Long and Short of It – the Madcap History of the Skirt, Ali Basye and Leela Corman (Unfinished)
*Mary Jane’s Outpost, Mary Jane Butters
*A Kid’s Catalog of Israel, Chaya M. Burstein
*Women Who Make the World Worse, Kate O’Beirne (In progress)
*Girlfriends Forever, Mary Branch (Unfinished)
*Good Mail Day: A Primer for Making Eye-Popping Postal Art, Jennie Hinchcliff and Carolee Gilligan Wheeler
*Among Schoolchildren, Tracey Kidder
*The I Hate to Cook Book: 50th Anniversary Edition, by Peg Bracken and Johanna Bracken

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Filed under Battle of Britain, Books, Books, Books, Children's, Faith, Fiction, Politics, Winston Churchill, World War II

Reading Material

As a quick look around our home will tell you, I love to read. Books, magazines, old letters, vintage catalogs (!), clipped articles, and yes, even cereal boxes. When I go to the antique mall or a garage sale, rarely do I buy anything that isn’t printed. Occasionally a pretty dish or a doll. Maybe a vintage article of clothing or old sewing supplies.


More often, my treasure sack contains various types of ephemera: old sewing patterns, a pattern catalog from the 1950s, a 16 Magazine from 1965, Needlecraft Magazine from 1932, a very well-worn elementary reader from the 1930s, a slim WWII volume: This is the Navy, a 1960 Montgomery Ward catalog, the little booklet/catalog that came with Barbie dolls in 1962, an old drama script, a handmade wedding album from the Depression, old high school and college yearbooks, cookbooks, paper dolls (!), school room ephemera (the seasonal cardboard cut-outs that teachers used to decorate their door with). Let’s pause and take a breath. (And yes, I know I ended that sentence with a preposition. It just didn’t sound right when I used “with which”.)

I just love the printed word.

However, not all printed words.

A few weeks ago Joe and I went to the Grapevine Public Library to see what offerings were in the Friends of the Library nook. These are items which have been donated to them, which they can’t keep and they will let you take them home for a donation to their funds.

One of the employees was re-stocking the shelves and I asked her if they had any donations which were too tattered to put out and that would go straight to the paper recycler. I explained that I like to do paper crafts and find it very difficult to tear up a book to use for projects (and I can never alter one that I liked). I explained the caveat that the books cannot be prurient, even for crafting. Can you just imagine a collaged piece from a Harold Robbins book?! Yikes!

(As a Fawlty Towers fan, I first typed Harold Robinson, then caught myself and corrected it. I think the Waldorf Salad episode was my favorite one.)

Anyway, she said that they had just received a large donation (I’m guessing several hundred books), most of which wouldn’t sell and that I could go into the office and look at them and see if there was anything I liked.


She showed me the Jalna series of books by Mazo de la Roche. The Jalna books were a popular series, the first of which was written in 1927. The lady told me that they would not sell.


Also there was the World War II collection by Winston Churchill, missing one volume.

On and on it went. I ended up with 41 books in my stack, knowing that only a few would end up as craft material. One slightly unpleasant aspect of all of it was the pricing. These were books without a price tag. Buyers are expected to come up with what they think is reasonable and fair. My general rule of thumb is a garage sale price. Magazines are a dime, children’s books and paperbacks a quarter and hardbacks .50 unless in very bad condition. But she wasn’t happy with my offer of $20.00.

Now, before you hit that comment link about how greedy I was, take a deep breath and remember that she considered all of these books unsaleable. They would get nothing for them when sent to the pulp mill. My choices were 39 hardbacks and 2 paperbacks (39 x .50 = $19.50 + .25 +.25 +$20.00). So, I offered her $25.00 and she accepted.

My plans are to read the Jalna series this summer, then perhaps start on the Churchill books this fall (they are huge – over 700 pages each; the usual goal of 1 book per week will collapse with those).

Many of the others are simply old novels. Maybe I’ll read them and then be willing to tear out the pages. But maybe not.


Three of them were old looking and when I read the titles I thought, “Surely I won’t mind tearing these up.”

Then we got them home and I really looked at them (I didn’t spend the time to look them over carefully while at the library).

One of belongs in a genealogy department because it’s an 1886 list of Illinois Civil War veterans, which includes their dates of service and promotions. Scratch this one from the scrap heap.


The next one is an 1898 volume called “The Lives of the Saints”. Even though we aren’t Catholic, a saint is a saint and my husband is particularly interested in St. Theresa of Avila, who is chapter one. Scratch this one from the scrap heap.


The last really old looking one was called the Illinois Blue Book, 1933-34. It was a state government book published in 1933. Alright! Here was one that I could use! A lot of cool looking photos of state officials and lists of government projects … and then right in the center is this gorgeous section of photos and drawings of the “Century of Progress Exposition 1833 – 1933, Held at Chicago, May 27 to Nov. 12, 1933”.

Argggghhhh!

And ebay? Ebay?? Someone save me from ebay. (However, I just got the bid on the most fantastic bundle of 1965 and 1967 Seventeen magazines. I’ll share the photos with you later.)

*Updated May 26, 2013

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Filed under 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960's, Altered Books, America, Books, Chicago, Cookbooks, Crafts, Crafts - Paper, Ephemera, Faith, Family, Fashion, Fiction, Grapevine, History, Humor, Internet links, Local Shopping, Sewing, Shopping, Texas, Vintage catalogs, Vintage Magazines, Winston Churchill, World War II