Category Archives: Military

The Truth Matters

13-Hours-The-Secret-Soldiers-of-Benghazi-poster-xl

It takes a special movie to separate us from the $20-40 it costs now.  When I saw the preview for 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi, it grabbed my attention.

 

“This is the true story of six men who had the courage to fight back.”

 

“This is the true story you were never told.”

 

My husband and I saw it yesterday, and it’s difficult for me to think about anything else.  Now I want to read the book, watch the interviews with the survivors and research the lies that Obama, Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden and Susan Rice told with straight faces to the American people.

 

Because those four didn’t simply lie about the cause of the attack, they are now lying about lying.  They couldn’t be more Orwellian if they were literally characters in Nineteen Eighty-Four.

 

In the presence of the 4 flag-draped coffins on the tarmac, Hillary Clinton lied to the families.

 

Now, she’s lying about lying.

 

Because of his lies to the American people and attempts to cover-up the Watergate break-in, Richard Nixon faced certain impeachment and therefore resigned the presidency on August 8, 1974.

 

Now, when those in the highest offices in Washington, D.C. lie and cover-up, they fly around on Air Force One and golf in exotic locations on the hard earned money of the American taxpayer.

 

Or they run for president.

 

After September 11, it was a common tool of the left to throw down the gauntlet of “Are you questioning my patriotism?!” when challenged on virtually any political point.  The weenies on the right would slink off with their tails between their legs, losing every time.

 

I say:  anyone who would vote for Lying Hillary Clinton does not love this country.

 

Cheers for Michael Bay and the stunningly courageous men who defended the compound in Benghazi!

 

America is not lost as long as we still have people like those brave men who will fight against all odds.

 

The truth matters.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under America, History, Military, Politics, Vicissitudes of Life

Pearl Harbor Day

Didn’t have the post ready for today, but here’s the link to a previous one I wrote about Pearl Harbor.

You don’t have to have been a visitor here very often to know that I have a great deal of admiration and gratitude to those serving in the U.S. military.

However, those who use their service to abuse other veterans don’t have my gratitude – just my contempt, at best.

Those who work for the Veteran’s Administration and use their passcodes to check up on the files of their enemies.

Or those who denigrate, debase and defame other veterans in court.

You know who you are.

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Filed under Family, Military

American veterans, I salute you

A big Thank You to the Americans who have altered the course of their lives for us – our veterans.

Your service stands out even more clearly this year when thousands of young people are behaving very badly in the occupy movement.

Looks like we all need to be reminded of the words from John Kennedy’s inaugural address given on January 20, 1961:

“Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”

Graphics taken from “The Good Citizen’s Handbook – A Guide to Proper Behavior” by Jennifer McKnight-Trontz.

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Happy Birthday, America!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CILIBlQ2D0Q The Ray Charles version of “America”.


Nice trailer for 1942’s “Yankee Doodle Dandy”, which we’ll watch this afternoon as we usually do on the 4th of July. I tried to post just the Yankee Doodle Dandy scene but embedding was disabled.

So, here’s the next best thing … the dance down the White House staircase at the end –

Happy 4th!

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Filed under 4th of July, America, Heros, Military, YouTube

Veteran’s Day

Love your freedom?

Thank a Veteran!

To all the veterans in my family and circle of friends, and also to all those I’ll never know personally:

THANK YOU!

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Filed under Current Events, Military, Veteran's Day

Cry Me a River

Monday has not been a great day.

Thomas Jefferson, on a rare snowy day in north Texas


Thomas Jefferson (our older son’s cat) is not doing well. He’s 14 years old, snuck outside about 3 weeks ago and got into a fight with something – we don’t know what. This I’m sure of, he didn’t start the fight. He’s a lover, not a fighter (by which I mean that he’s a very loving cat; he was neutered when he was young).

This morning we took him back to the vet for the third time. I don’t know if he’s going to make it and it’s breaking my heart. He has lived with Joe and me for a good part of his colorful life.

Packing up for Afghanistan deployment


When Judah was posted to Fort Drum, Joe and I took Thomas with us on the plane. Then when Judah was deployed, we went up and brought Thomas back home to Texas. He was very good on the plane; in fact, he only meowed a couple of times and I think hardly anyone even knew that we had a cat with us.

Joe and Thomas Jefferson


He was not only a very good traveler, he’s been a very good cat. We’ve had very little trouble out of him over the years. He didn’t engage in bad behavior, like some other cats I could name (LaFayette, are you listening??), and he always moved well. Most cats don’t like to move and will run off, but he has moved several times with Judah (and once with us) and he adjusted to his new home just fine, every time.

And now this. I know that pets don’t live forever but even when they live a long time, it doesn’t seem long enough. Their passing just breaks my heart. When I was in 4th grade our teacher read “Black Beauty” aloud to our class. The last chapters in the book where the horse was mistreated were devastating to me. I’ve never watched “Old Yeller”. I just can’t. (SPOILER) When I watch “My Dog Skip”, I ball like a baby; the last time I watched it (it’s a wonderful movie), I quit before the dog died.

A couple of weeks ago, Joe and I went to see “Ramona and Beezus” (which was also wonderful – and isn’t my husband a great guy to take me to a children’s movie, and not even complain? It makes that whole thing about going with him to “Lord of the Rings” not so bad). Anyway, the family in R & B has a cat, and … well, just take some kleenex in your purse.

This is just another one of those things in life that I’m not very good at … saying goodbye.

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Filed under Books, Cats, Children's, Family, Fiction, Heros, Military, Movies, New York, Vicissitudes of Life

American Heros

http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid1407952648?bctid=1664436922

This is a short film about how our wounded are transported back to the United States.

Bagran Air Force Base in Afghanistan is where our son was posted 3 years ago.

I love the American military!

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Filed under America, Current Events, Family, Heros, Military

Pearl Harbor

These photographs were taken in peacetime:

U.S.S. Arizona

U.S.S. Arizona, Pearl Harbor



Naval History and Heritage Command
is an excellent source for historical information about the attack on Pearl Harbor and all of the above photographs come from their site.

National Archives page with radiogram and original documents.

U.S.S. West Virginia, Pearl Harbor

The United States and Japan were not at war with each other when Japan attacked our military installations on Sunday morning, Dec. 7, 1941. Our country had failed to understand the evil and underestimated the threat.

May we learn from our mistakes.

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Filed under 1940s, America, Heros, History, Internet links, Military, World War II

Plymouth and Nearby Environs


When I was a girl, I always loved the stories about the Pilgrims and the early years of America. History was one of my favorite subjects, but there was something really special and American about the story of the people who left their home in search of religious freedom, came across the ocean in a crowded boat and made new lives for themselves and their families in a wilderness.

Three years ago, I accompanied Joe on a business trip to Massachusetts and was so excited to finally get to visit the place I had read about 40 years ago. And although I had plenty of time to explore the Plymouth area, unfortunately many of the sites are closed in December, but I visited what I could. One of my first stops was Pilgrim Hall, the museum established and built in 1824.

Pilgrim Hall - I call it the Politcally Correct Palace


After about 5 minutes I felt like I’d been slapped in the face and that the museum curators were trying to kick the wind out of me. There was no honor of the Pilgrims, no celebration of their experience. All of the plaques describing the paintings and artifacts sneeringly contradicted the traditional story. What was left was how awful all this intrusion was to the Indians and how noble they were.

It was politically correct to the Nth, nauseating degree. I couldn’t believe it. They kept emphasizing that all those stories we read before were false; of course that was before the enlightened ones starting writing the history books.

(A few years before that we’d been to the Smithsonian and I was absolutely shocked at how PC it was. The exhibit on World War II was overwhelmingly focused on the Japanese internment. What little space that was devoted to the American GI was negative. It described that everywhere our soldiers went, there was rape, venereal disease and unwanted, half-American children.)

(I had better cover myself here because I don’t have a lawyer on retainer – the following is my opinion. Liberals tend to be sensitive and lawsuit happy.)A rhetorical question:are the same jaded, hair-shirt-wearing, self-flagellating, over-educated nincompoops in charge of all the museums dedicated to the American experience?

Please, say it isn’t so.

View of the bay, Plymouth, Massachusetts


Plymouth, Massachusetts has an incredibly precious heritage. Is that what you’ll find on their webpage? No, you’ll find one of those boxes on the left that shouts: “No Place for Hate”. What does that mean? Do they actually believe that other American towns advocate the opposite? The only reference to their role in American history is the following from City of Plymouth official website which says: “Most Americans are familiar with the story of the pilgrims’ voyage across the Atlantic aboard the Mayflower, and their landing at Plymouth Rock. Today, Plymouth Rock is just one of the sites that tell the story of Plymouth. When you visit our Town, you will learn about more than the pilgrim voyage, you will learn about our diverse and unique community. ” (emphasis mine)

Even the unofficial town website doesn’t have any history, but they do have another one of those little boxes. They aren’t warning us about hate. It tells us about International Day of Climate Action! (exclamation mark theirs).

But there is hope! (exclamation mine) The following quotes are from an article from the Plymouth Guide titled Putting the Thanks back in Thanksgiving – New book embraces treasured Pilgrim saga.

Hooray for the Plymouth Guide.

A big double hooray for Jeremy Bangs.

Strangers and Pilgrims, the 928-page history of the Pilgrims by Jeremy Bangs, explores the religious and political foundations of the Pilgrims in England and Holland and finds historical basis for much of the treasured Pilgrim tradition.”

“Bangs, for instance, points to the false notion that the Pilgrims never referred to themselves as Pilgrims. While some have suggested the name was invented in the 19th century, Bangs said the title of his book, Strangers and Pilgrims, comes from a quotation published by Robert Cushman in 1622.”

“Bangs said he has no stake in how the story plays out, but admits he is amused to see so many of the original notions about the Pilgrims have proven to be more or less accurate.”

If I had it to do all over again, I’d still go through the exhibit, because it does contain the actual belongings of the Pilgrims which is incredible to me, but I’d ignore their little plaques signs and explanations.

Doll from Mayflower passage, 1620


The swords and furniture were interesting, but what I really was drawn to was a little doll, carried on the Mayflower by Mary Chilton. How in the world could something as fragile as that rag doll survive almost 400 years? I don’t know, but I’m so glad it did. I can’t find a photo of it, either on the Pilgrim Hall website or doing image searches. If anyone knows where there’s a picture of it, please let me know. I did a rough sketch and made a few notes, but it’s hard to tell anything about it. The description said it was made from wool, linen and cotton.

I wonder who made it. Mary? Her mother? In England or Holland? Maybe on the Mayflower itself.

As a lover of textiles, I consider it a real American treasure.

First Congregation Church - Middleboro, Massachusetts


In nearby Middleboro is the First Congregational Church

organized in 1694 by the children of the Mayflower Pilgrims.

Ceiling of First Congregation Church


The current structure was built in 1828.

Auditorium - First Congregational Church


Across the road is an old cemetery. Some thoughtful person had placed flags on the graves of U.S. military veterans.


This headstone marks the grave of a Revolutionary War soldier.

Cranberry bog - near Middlleboro Massachusetts,


This is what a cranberry bog looks like. I think they’re beautiful.

And incidentally, if it’s a can of Ocean Spray cranberry sauce that you open on Thanksgiving, you might be interested to know that O.S. is not a corporation – it’s an agricultural cooperative of the growers. If you ever find yourself in Middleboro or Lakeview, Massachusetts, give yourself a treat and go see the Ocean Spray headquarters. A winding drive, the little bridge over the stream with swans swimming on it and the white colonial style building, it is the nicest business office I’ve ever seen.

Here in our region we have Big Lot stores, and they’re pretty good, but I’ve never seen anything like Ocean State Job Lots. I could spend hours in that store. Just take an extra suitcase and a little extra cash is all I have to say. I bought everything from poppy seeds to gourmet snack items to dishes to stamp pads to tools and blenders in there – all at very good prices.

Going into Benny’s in Raynham, Massachusetts was like time travel for me. In 1950’s and 1960’s Tulsa, we had OTASCO stores (Oklahoma Tire and Suppy Company). Benny’s is so like them I could’ve believed I was a kid again. From the traditional looking shopping center and sign out front to the smell when I walked in the door, I felt like I was in a time warp and I enjoyed every minute of it. I actually did a lot of Christmas shopping there, too. If I lived in that area, Benny’s would be one of my regular stops.

Coming back around to the history of the region, the people of New England are so blessed to be surrounded by history everywhere;this region is absolutely rich with roots in our country’s founding and early days. I wish New Englanders viewed that as something to be treasured rather than something to be embarrassed about.

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Filed under 1950s, 1960's, America, Books, Childhood pastimes, Cooking, Current Events, Faith, Heros, History, Internet links, Local Shopping, Military, Shopping, Thanksgiving

Veterans Day

My two veterans joined our military during times of war and served in the war zones.

Joe Hoag, USS Meredith
Joe, United States Navy, 1966-1970 Viet Nam War

Bagran Air Base, Afghanistan, 2006

Bagran Air Base, Afghanistan, 2006


Our son, United States Army, 2005-2009, Afghanistan

They are my heroes.

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Filed under America, Current Events, Heros, History, Military