Category Archives: Politics

Changing the rules

When the other side changes the rules, then they must also play by them.

Click here for Kurt Schlichter’s column on fairness.

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The Truth Matters

13-Hours-The-Secret-Soldiers-of-Benghazi-poster-xl

It takes a special movie to separate us from the $20-40 it costs now.  When I saw the preview for 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi, it grabbed my attention.

 

“This is the true story of six men who had the courage to fight back.”

 

“This is the true story you were never told.”

 

My husband and I saw it yesterday, and it’s difficult for me to think about anything else.  Now I want to read the book, watch the interviews with the survivors and research the lies that Obama, Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden and Susan Rice told with straight faces to the American people.

 

Because those four didn’t simply lie about the cause of the attack, they are now lying about lying.  They couldn’t be more Orwellian if they were literally characters in Nineteen Eighty-Four.

 

In the presence of the 4 flag-draped coffins on the tarmac, Hillary Clinton lied to the families.

 

Now, she’s lying about lying.

 

Because of his lies to the American people and attempts to cover-up the Watergate break-in, Richard Nixon faced certain impeachment and therefore resigned the presidency on August 8, 1974.

 

Now, when those in the highest offices in Washington, D.C. lie and cover-up, they fly around on Air Force One and golf in exotic locations on the hard earned money of the American taxpayer.

 

Or they run for president.

 

After September 11, it was a common tool of the left to throw down the gauntlet of “Are you questioning my patriotism?!” when challenged on virtually any political point.  The weenies on the right would slink off with their tails between their legs, losing every time.

 

I say:  anyone who would vote for Lying Hillary Clinton does not love this country.

 

Cheers for Michael Bay and the stunningly courageous men who defended the compound in Benghazi!

 

America is not lost as long as we still have people like those brave men who will fight against all odds.

 

The truth matters.

 

 

 

 

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Filed under America, History, Military, Politics, Vicissitudes of Life

What a relief!

Now let’s see them legislate representing the American people.

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Subterfuge at McDonald’s

Today after church we met our pastor and one of his daughters at McDonald’s for lunch. We sat talking for quite awhile after we finished eating.

A young woman (maybe 19 or 20 years old) was walking around the restaurant, stopping at various tables for a minute or so. She approached our table with her cell phone held in front of her and asked our pastor’s daughter (hereafter referred to as P.D.) if she would participate in a … I can’t remember what she called it …. it wasn’t a public service announcement, but something like that.

She wanted two words repeated, which she would record with her cellphone camera, and said that the recordings of several people would be spliced together to make the video. We’ve all seen these things on television or the internet; it looks like a patchwork statement.

P. D. is a young adult and can make her own decisions and she agreed and did it.

Next, the girl turned to our pastor and asked him. He replied by asking what her t-shirt said. (It was some kind of leftist nonsense.)

Then he asked her what was the goal of the video she was making. She replied that it had to do with nutrition.

At that point, I joined the conversation and asked if it was an anti-McDonald’s video. She looked a little sheepish and said yes.

I told her that we wouldn’t assist her because we love McDonald’s, to which she said “I’m sorry.” I said she didn’t have to be sorry about it because we were happy to eat there.

So she left our table and kept going around to other tables looking for unsuspecting tools for her propaganda.

Now that made me mad. If she wanted to ask students at her campus (she looked like a high school or college student) to participate but informing them first what her goals were, that’s one thing.

But to play upon the generosity of strangers and then make them look like fools is something entirely different. It’s dishonest and cruel.

Just what I’d expect from the Left.

So, please be aware that there are wolves among the sheep, and if an innocent-looking young person or innocent looking old person or anyone else asks you to participate in something – ask questions before you agree.

Or you’re likely to see yourself on a video, seemingly saying something that you never said.

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Filed under Cafes/Restaurants, Current Events, Food, Politics, Vicissitudes of Life

Thieves and Robbers

Since the pastor of First Baptist Church of Dallas got into a brouhaha over Mitt Romney, I’ve been thinking about the differences between Christianity and other religions.

Jesus said some pretty tough things about how to get to heaven.

In this age of inclusiveness and tolerance, His words are shocking.

They are a plumb-line. (Amos 7:7 Thus he shewed me: and, behold, the LORD stood upon a wall made by a plumbline, with a plumbline in his hand.)

John 10:1 “Truly, truly, I say to you, he who does not enter by the door into the fold of the sheep, but climbs up some other way, he is a thief and a robber.” “Truly, truly, I say to you, I am the door of the sheep.” John 10:7 (New American Standard)

A thief? A robber?

I can just hear the modern admonition: “But Jesus, you have to be nice!”

“Not everyone who says to Me, Lord, Lord, will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father Who is in heaven.” Matthew 7:21

Matthew 7:13-14 “Enter through the narrow gate; for wide is the gate and spacious and broad is the way that leads away to destruction, and many are those who are entering through it.

But the gate is narrow (contracted by pressure) and the way is straitened and compressed that leads away to life, and few are those who find it.” (Amplified)

Well.

How terribly politically incorrect Jesus is.

You may ask: The one who claimed to be the Son of God … you mean that He doesn’t place a moral equivalence on all religions and beliefs?

Right. That’s what He said.

He is the only begotten Son of God. John 3:16

Only begotten. Jesus and Lucifer are not brothers (a tenet of Mormonism).

“Beware of false prophets, who come to you dressed as sheep, but inside they are devouring wolves.” Matthew 7:15

There are more false prophets now than at any time during my life. Big ones (who form their own multi-million member following); and small ones, individuals who have a Colorform Spirituality (I”l take yoga and reincarnation from the Hindus, philosophy from Buddhism, earth worship from American Indians, etc.).

Jesus clearly said: “I am the Way, the Truth and the Life. No man comes to the Father but by Me.” John 14:6

God doesn’t grade on a curve. I’m not going to heaven because I’m better than Hitler, or that I’m a “pretty good person”. Nobody is going on those terms.

“For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;” Romans 3:23

Women don’t get there by being called up by their husbands (another tenet of Joseph Smith). We get there by confessing our sin, accepting and believing in Jesus.

That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. Romans 10:9

We all fall short – every single one of us.

And that’s why we need the Savior – to bridge that sin chasm between us and a perfect God.

Therefore, it’s Jesus + 0 = heaven.

It’s God’s heaven and he made the rules for admission.

Go here to read more about the differences between Christianity and Jehovah’s Witness.

For information about Mormonism, go here

and

here.

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Books Read in March, 2011

Heaven Is For Real/Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent (2010). A slim volume and an easy read, Heave Is For Real was a pleasure. Even though I’ve been a Christian almost all of my life and I know I’ll go to be with Jesus when I die, I’ve never pondered much about what heaven will be like. Four-year-old Colton Burpo relates his experiences and what he saw in heaven over a period of time, rather than immediately upon his recovery from his illness. Here is their website .

This book was a huge encouragement to me.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

The Boy Who Came Back From Heaven: A Remarkable Account of Miracles,Angels and Life Beyond this World/Kevin Malarkey and Alex Malarkey(2010). Another book about a young boy who has experienced heaven and came back to tell. It’s a little more painful to read because of the father’s guilt (his distraction and unfamiliarity with a dangerous intersection led to the car accident which severely injured his son). Go here to their website.

God bless this courageous boy and his family!

RECOMMENDED

The House at World’s End,/Monica Dickens (1970). Miss Dickens is the great-grandaughter of that other Dickens we all know, Charles. It’s not fair to compare the descendants of a genius (and I do believe that C.D. was truly a genius), so I won’t. Maybe her other books are better, and I will give them a try, but this one was just a story to frame the message about not being cruel to animals. And that is a worthy cause and one that I support, but somehow it just comes across more as a sermon than a good story.

This is the tale of a family of children who are pretty much left on their own after their house burns, their mother has a long hospitalization from burns she received, an uncle who only nominally looks after them and a father who would rather sail around the world than take care of his family.

My family and I have adopted many homeless animals over the years, so I understand Miss Dickens’ dedication to alleviate suffering; I just wish she’d written a better book for the cause.

Incidentally, The House At World’s End is juvenile fiction, but I wouldn’t recommend it to sensitive children. There were a few descriptive passages that I had to skip. Maybe tougher kids won’t have a problem with those scenes, but I would never have been able to handle them as a child.

It isn’t boring and it’s not a terrible book; I just think it could’ve been better.

RECOMMENDED WITH RESERVATIONS

How Starbucks Saved My Life/Michael Gill (2007). The title grabbed me, so I read it. And it is interesting but … it’s just a little creepy because Mr. Gill worships Starbucks (and I’m not kidding). He was a down and out Madison Avenue (advertising business) executive who lost his job, and then his family (due to unfaithfulness) and got a job making coffee. It’s true, in his earlier years he led an interesting life and perhaps he used this framework to tell it. He’s met a lot of famous people, from Frank Sinatra to Frank Lloyd Wright to Queen Elizabeth. But his obsequious fawning just came across as sad to me; Starbucks is not a fit religion. Maybe Starbucks did save his life, but it won’t save his soul.

NOT RECOMMENDED

(This is not the complete account of what I read during March, but I had to rely on my memory. That may not be such a good thing because my memory has failed to tell me where I left the list of books. When I find it, I’ll do an update.)

Partially Read and intend to finish:
The Last Mrs. Astor

The Friendly Dickens

The Book of Awesome

Witness, Whitaker Chambers.

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Books Read, January 2011,

*Death of a Charming Man by M.C. Beaton. First published in 1994, this is Beaton’s 10th Hamish Macbeth mystery. The story centers around the effect of English newcomer, Peter Hynd on the small village of Drim in northern Scotland. Peter has a malicious streak and it becomes his downfall. Lochdubh police sergeant Macbeth warns Hynd to tread easily around the local Highlanders, but of course, he’s heedless.

The Hamish Macbeth series are cozy mysteries, though not quite as cozy as Agatha Christie’s books. Whose are? Grotesque descriptions are rare, along with bad language and sexual content. That being said, there was one section with a very un-cozy word.

Possibly it’s my imagination, but it seems that Beaton gets a little bored with the romantic relationship between Hamish and Priscilla Halburton-Smythe. Priscilla is not a sympathetic character; actually she’s fairly off-putting. Am I supposed to like her?

Hamish on the other hand, is someone I’d love to have as my local constable, despite his failings (mooching, laziness and all too often, a lack of loyalty).

Are there really policemen like him somewhere?

*Death in the Downs by Simon Brett
What’s the deal with so many current books? No happy marriages, affairs galore, no traditional religion, endorsements of New Age silliness.

Technically, this one is well written. The story moves along, clues are injected along with red herrings, it’s interesting and it ties up most of the loose ends.

On the other hand, it’s full of excessive drinking, mysticism and bad men. There is only one good/sympathetic man in the whole book.

I suppose Simon Brett really is a man, but he writes like a world-weary, jilted feminist who never met an alternative religion that he/she didn’t like.

It’s been a few years since I last read a Simon Brett mystery. The cynicism surprised me.

There are virtually no happy marriages in this book. Carole’s husband left her, one woman with an overbearing husband uses tranquilizers, another wife drinks, one couple is uncommunicative and then they part, and the “doctor” is a serial philanderer. Jude is not married but has an unpleasant relationship with her paramour, which we are thankfully spared the details. Parent/child relationships don’t fare much better.

And speaking of drinking … that’s practically all these characters do, besides intimidate, murder and commit mayhem and masochism. They are constantly drinking, not just at the pub but opening the second bottle of wine, etc.

New Age therapies are repeatedly defended- no matter how bizarre. At the end, we are treated to a discourse on the emptiness of traditional religion by the killer.

The writing is adept, the content leaves something to be desired. Come to think of it, Simon Brett seems more jaded than cynical. Perhaps he thinks he’s post-modern. Maybe he writes because his New Age healer prescribes it.

*Witness for the Prosecution by Agatha Christie. Years ago, Joe and I saw the movie with Marlene Dietrich and Tyrone Power, an excellent production. Since I’m always on the lookout for copies of Agatha Christie books, I bought a paperback copy and read it last week.

The first chapter told the whole story of the movie, so I thought there had been some Hollywood interference with the original and that there must be a lot more that had been pared down. The second chapter had a whole new cast of characters, but many books do that – using the first several chapters to introduce new settings, etc… By the beginning of the 3rd chapter, I realized that it was a book of short stories! I looked at the front and back covers and the flyleaf and nowhere did it say it was a book of short stories, so I felt a little less foolish.

The second odd thing about the book, was that the day I finished it, I watched a movie on Hulu titled “Love From a Stranger”. As it went on, I thought that it seemed very familiar. When the wife read the notation in her husband’s diary “9:00 p.m.”, I knew! It was the same story as “Philomel Cottage”, chapter 8 in Witness for the Prosecution. I checked the imdb page for the movie to see if they acknowledged Christie’s original story and indeed they did.

Now, it may seem that I was pretty stupid not to connect it before but lots of details had been changed. Christie wrote the book in 1924 and I think the tales are contemporary to that time; the movie is set in 1901. In the book the husband claims to be a photographer; in the movie he’s a scientist. Her sudden influx of money is explained by an inheritance in the book, and the film has her winning the pools (lottery). And there are many other things expanding the original story – so it wasn’t a clearcut case of simply not paying attention on my part.

I thought all that it was kind of a quirky co-incidence and it has absolutely no significance. Just an interesting interlude.

*Possessed: the Life of Joan Crawford, by Donald Spoto I can’t look or think of Joan Crawford without thinking Mommy Dearest, so when I saw this on the New Books shelf at the library I hesitated. But I was willing to consider that maybe that was a distorted view of her when I saw that Spoto claimed that she was misunderstood and had new archival information. Perhaps Christina was merely bitter after having been left out of the will.

But I will never know because I can’t get past the alternative lifestyle agenda of the author. He takes every opportunity to campaign for it and it’s tiring.

Hollywood history has long fascinated me, but I’ll have to satisfy my curiosity elsewhere.

Unfinished and NOT RECOMMENDED

The Blue Sapphire by D.E. Stevenson This was a re-read for me. Back in the mid-197s, Wal-Mart carried a lot of D.E. Stevenson reprints with new artwork on the covers and I bought several of them. The Blue Sapphire was originally published in 1963 but the cover on my book is straight out of the 1970s: her ruffled, loose dress, wedge sandals and long, flowing curls; his open necked shirt with the big collar and styled hair. When I read a book, I really like to picture the time setting in my mind – and the early 60s were not like the 70s, in any fashion.

Therefore, I see this as an opportunity to do an altered bookjacket.

The Blue Sapphire is a cozy romance and a quick read. It’s pleasant with likable characters, although I must say that I found Julie ( the female protagonist) a bit stuffy at times. Perhaps that makes it more believable.

(Dorothy Emily Peploe’s father was Robert Louis Stevenson’s cousin; she used her maiden name when she wrote, but the copyright is in her married name.)

RECOMMENDED

*Tides by V.M. Caldwell (Juvenile Fiction) The sequel to The Ocean Within targets 5th – 9th grade readers. It’s the continuing story of 12 year old Elizabeth who was adopted into the Sheridan family one year previously. All the Sheridan grandchildren spend each summer at their grandmother’s house on the ocean. Which ocean? We don’t know, but the clues are: the kids spot Vermont license tags on the journey there; it’s not Maine and there are pine trees right up to the beach. That’s a minor issue. However, the author doesn’t tell us why Elizabeth is afraid of the water, which is the main issue in the book. At the end, we are left to kind of …well… guess.

The writing is well crafted and held my interest. The subject matter is enjoyable – a house full of cousins, summertime, the beach, a town with a movie theater that shows W.C. Fields films. This is fun stuff to me. But the dark cloud is the intrusion of social issues – Elizabeth aids an environmentalist who’s trying to catch polluters.

Tides is a publication of Milkweed Editions, which is a non-profit publisher who “publishes with the intention of making a humane impact on society, in the belief that literature is a transformative art uniquely able to convey the essential experiences of the human heart and spirit”, according their note at the back of the book. At least they are upfront and bold in stating their goal.

My beef is that 10 year olds don’t need the weight of the world on their shoulders and how dare authors and publishers try to rob them of their childhood.

What they didn’t mind was inserting some gaia earth worship and a brief little ceremony for “mother ocean”. Perhaps they think they’re being ecumenical because they also devote very short passages to Judaism, Catholicism, as well as mentioning Hinduism, Buddhism and agnosticism. Talk about all-inclusive.

One very surprising element was the subject of spanking. Grandmother spanks. Everyone agrees that she’s fair about it, and there’s the agnostic mother’s disapproval of it, but I thought it was unusual aspect of a modern novel.

NOT RECOMMENDED for children.

The beach/family vacation storyline was much better done in The Secret of Cross Bone Hill by Wilson Gage.


*Theater Shoes
by Noel Streatfield (Juvenile Fiction) It was in the movie “You’ve Got Mail” that I first heard of the Shoe books. I didn’t know if they were real books, or just something fictionalized for that story. When I did an internet search (remember this was about 1998) the cupboard was bare.

Then when I looking over the Books for a Donation area at the library – there it was – Theater Shoes! I added it to my stack of purchases, brought it home and read it right away.

It’s a delightful episode in the continuing story of a Dancing/Theater school in London. This go-round was written in 1945 and concerns 3 children whose guardian grandfather dies. Since their mother is deceased and their father is missing in action with the British army, they have nowhere else to go but to a grandmother they’ve never met. Unbeknownst to them, their maternal relatives are all theater people and they are enrolled in Madame Fidolia’s Children’s Academy of Dancing and Stage Training, which to them is like falling down the rabbit hole.

This passage from`Chapter 14 describes how the war had changed the appearance of a first night theater audience: “The audience was exactly as Miriam had said it would be, and not a bit as Alice had described it. The women were in uniform or dark overcoats, and most of them had big boots with fur linings. The men were in uniform or exactly as they had come on from work. Nobody was dressed up. Aunt Lindsey was looking very nice in a black frock and fur coat, but only nice in the way that anybody might look in the afternoon.”

Even though it’s written for older children, Theater Shoes is a charming book which held my interest.

RECOMMENDED

*Night by Elie Wiesel This is a tough book to read, which I knew going in. It is the story of Wiesel and his Jewish family in the early days of World War II, their deportation to Auschwitz, then Buchenwald. At first there is his father, mother and sister. The mother and sister are separated from them, then his father is gone.

It’s the story of the price of survival.

It is a horrible and cruel book. One that we need to read every time we’re told that Israel is expendable.

The Gentile world turned it’s collective back on the Jews. They have no other place to go but Israel.

God bless his chosen people and the land He gave them.

RECOMMENDED for the strong

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Books Read, March – December 2010

During my recovery period last spring and summer, it was really difficult to get back to all kinds of normal activity which includes reading, regular blogging and almost everything else. For nearly a month after the surgery, I virtually didn’t read. And upon resuming, I didn’t keep good records about what I’d read and when.

But as I’m trying to catch up on a bit of blog-housekeeping, here goes.

Note: The categories are general, and entries are not alphabetized. Several entries have “In progress” noted. These I hope to finish. An “Unfinished” designation means that these are ones that I probably will never finish, usually because I didn’t care for them.

So, here’s the list from March – December, 2010, to the best of my memory ( as I recall others, I’ll add them on):

FICTION

Cozy
*Changes at Fairacre, Miss Read (reread)
*Farewell to Fairacre, Miss Read (reread)
*A Peaceful Retirement, Miss Read (reread)
*Mrs. Pringle, Miss Read (reread)
*Pilgrim’s Inn, Elizabeth Goudge
*The Scent of Water, Elizabeth Goudge
*Green Dolphin Street, Elizabeth Goudge (Unfinished)
*Julia’s Hope, Leisha Kelly (reread)

General Fiction
*Charlotte and Dr. James, Guy McCrone
*The Green Years, A.J. Cronin
*So Well Remembered, James Hilton

Mystery
*The Moving Finger, Agatha Christie (reread)
*The Cat Who Wasn’t a Dog, Marian Babson
*Agatha Raisin: There Goes the Bride, M.C. Beaton
*Death of a Gentle Lady, M.C. Beaton
*Death of a Valentine, M.C. Beaton
*The Case of the Daring Decoy, Erle Stanley Gardner
*The Case of the Queenly Contestant, Erle Stanley Gardner
*The Case of the Phantom Fortune, Erle Stanley Gardner
*The Case of the Troubled Trustee, Erle Stanley Gardner (reread)
*The Case of the Footloose Doll, Erle Stanley Gardner (reread)
*The Case of the Worried Waitress, Erle Stanley Gardner (reread)

Children’s/Youth Fiction
*The Secret of Crossbone Hill, Wilson Gage

NON-FICTION

Biography and Personal Reminiscences

*An American Family, Reid Buckley
*Living it up at National Review, Priscilla Buckley
*It Gives Me Great Pleasure, Emily Kimbrough
*All of a Kind Family, Sydney Taylor
*The Sea for Breakfast, Lillian Beckwith
*Out of the Air, Mary Margaret McBride
*Mostly in Clover, Harry J. Boyle

World War II
*The Raft, Robert Trumbull
*Homefront, Norman Longmate
*The Gathering Storm, Winston Churchill (In progress)

Faith
*Loving God, Charles Colson (In progress)
*God and Man at Yale, William F. Buckley, Jr. (In progress)
*Cup of Comfort Book of Prayer: Stories and reflections that bring you closer to God,James Stuart Bell and Susan B Townsend

General Non-Fiction
*Charlotte Mason Education, Catherine Levison
*The Long and Short of It – the Madcap History of the Skirt, Ali Basye and Leela Corman (Unfinished)
*Mary Jane’s Outpost, Mary Jane Butters
*A Kid’s Catalog of Israel, Chaya M. Burstein
*Women Who Make the World Worse, Kate O’Beirne (In progress)
*Girlfriends Forever, Mary Branch (Unfinished)
*Good Mail Day: A Primer for Making Eye-Popping Postal Art, Jennie Hinchcliff and Carolee Gilligan Wheeler
*Among Schoolchildren, Tracey Kidder
*The I Hate to Cook Book: 50th Anniversary Edition, by Peg Bracken and Johanna Bracken

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The party vs. the people

Five O'Clock Tea, by Mary Cassatt


Christine O’Donnell has my admiration and my empathy. I fought the country club Republicans on a much lower level and I lost. She persevered and won.

Most of us want people to like us and it’s hard to stand up and make yourself a target. It’s even difficult to stand up at a meeting of our own kind – whatever that is, i.e. social club, church, P.T.A., or in this instance my own political party, – and speak what’s on our heart, if we think it will go against the grain. It’s rough to look at disapproving faces and hear your words twisted and demonized.

The powers-that-be want to keep it an exclusive club. The Good Old Boy network was designed to keep us (the riffraff) out.

Hooray for Christine!

After September 11, 2001, I dipped my toe in the political pool. The uncertainty of our nation’s future concerned me and I believed that it was time to get involved. Joe and I began attending the Republican meetings for our county. A women’s group was forming and I attended and got involved. One year I served as secretary of the group, then as vice-president. I attended district meetings, workshops and ran a fund-raiser. We were a small but active group. Our president couldn’t run again because our constitution limited service to 2 terms. So I decided to run for president for the next year. I had some good ideas, was enthusiastic and seemed to have the support of some of the members.

Then we had an informal officers meeting and the husband of one of our other board members not only attended, and not only entered into the discussion – he tried to choose the next president for us. I don’t know why he felt entitled to try to call the shots. Perhaps because he was one of the movers and shakers in the county party. Maybe because he thought a lot of himself. I don’t know.

As a women’s club, the men were allowed to join, but never to voice opinions or try to control anything in any way.

Needless to say, I was not his choice for the next president of the club. He preferred a rather pushy woman who had only recently joined.

She was country club. I was trailer house.

Even if it hadn’t been me that was running, I would’ve felt that it was too early for anyone to become president after only 6 months of membership.

Now bear in mind that there are lots and lots of trailers and very few people who qualify for country club membership in our rural county. That I had worked hard for the party, and had even become an election precinct chairman didn’t matter.

The group decided to ignore the man’s preference and elected me and things went sort-of-okay for awhile.

The woman, who shall henceforth be referred to as C.C.W. (Country Club Woman), was elected to another board position and she proceeded to make things difficult for me from the word go. Very difficult. She rode me like a harpy. In fact, it was so stressful dealing with her that I broke out in hives.

Then I had a debilitating health problem and I couldn’t cope with her constant haranguing and my health problem, so I quit taking her calls for a week or two. She went berserk.

In hindsight, I can see that it wasn’t a wise thing to do, but I had about reached the end of my rope with her. I recuperated some and got back into the swing of things, but she grew even more and more difficult to deal with.

She was in charge of the fund raiser and absolutely refused to abide by the state law concerning donations. Had we been cited by the state for violations, the treasurer (not C.C.W) would’ve been in serious trouble. It was a jail-able offense. Time and time again I told her to stay within the confines of the law and she flat-out refused. She said that the club she’d belonged to in the state she used to live in did it that way and that she couldn’t raise money if she followed the Texas law.

I consulted officers from the state level as well as state officials. They all said that she couldn’t do what she was doing. But she wouldn’t stop. I was told that at a fund-raiser committee meeting, Carla-bashing was a favorite topic.

Then it came to a head at a board meeting. I said flat out that she had to stop. She got upset and said in that case, she would resign. I asked if there was a motion to accept her resignation, which there was, it was seconded and accepted.

The next day she changed her mind but it was too late. I’d had enough. She denied that she had resigned but I had (legally) tape-recorded the meeting (at the beginning of the tape I announced that it was being taped and then did a roll call).

Then I did something stupid. We had arranged for a workshop in our county and I tried to cancel it – only one of our officers was going to attend; our club was in tatters. C.C.W. was going to attend and it was going to get ugly. The state officers wouldn’t allow us to cancel.

C.C.W. got busy. If I was Davy Crockett (this is for the sake of analogy only and to illustrate that she had the big guns on her side; no way do I think I’m on a par with Davy Crockett), she was Santa Ana. She worked and got the good-old-boy network behind her. The county judge really let me have it. If he yelled at other people the way he yelled at me, then I understand why he was defeated in the following primary.

The organization’s state officials all supported her. Our district representative to the state organization backed her. It got worse before it got better. Except for the vice-president (who sided with C.C.W) all of the board members dropped out of the club and county politics.

When I failed to get any visible support from the county party officials, I resigned as precinct chairman. They appointed a RINO (Republican in Name Only) to run our precinct election, which meant that the Democrats once more ran the polling place the way they wanted. I had made them do it by the book and they probably hated me.

So, all this is to say that, like Christine O’Donnell, I brought along my own baggage. I wasn’t perfect but I wanted to serve and make a difference, and maybe I did for about 3 years. Until I hit the snob wall.

My sincere wish is that more ordinary people run for every kind of office. I hope they’ll be tougher than I was and thicker-skinned.

Phooey on Party-approved candidates over People-approved candidates.

Again, yea grass-roots candidates!

Now, let’s all have a cup of tea to celebrate.

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September 11, 2010

It was 9 years ago today that 19 Islamic terrorists attacked our country and murdered 2,977 innocent people on American soil.

There had been many attacks before: the Marine barracks in Beirut, the U.S.S. Cole, the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center. For a more complete list, go here.

But on September 11 it looked like a declaration of war on American soil.

Or so we thought.

Our lousy leaders do not act as if we’re at war. George W. Bush talked about it as the War on Terror until his advisors (probably Karen Hughes, Condoleeza Rice and Colin Powell) wielded their influence. The current administration doesn’t even seem to think there’s a problem.

I’m tempted to say that I cannot believe what has happened to our country in the time since. But I can. In fact, my thoughts on September 12, 2001 were focused on how the liberal left was going to spin this vicious attack to their advantage. They have accomplished a lot.

I well remember the media’s sneering disdain for the outpouring of patriotism during those first few weeks. They “protected” us by restricting the images of the attacks.

Here’s what we now have:

The attacks are commonly referred to as a “tragedy” (misfortune). They were not tragedies. They were abominations.

A man elected president who was not even raised in this country and has an Islamic background and affection.

A man elected as president who bowed to the king of Saudia Arabia but purposely insulted our friends, the British (and not merely once). President Bush was very little better concerning the Saudis, but at least he didn’t actively try to offend our friends. Obama is also alienating our friends in Israel with his horrible treatment of Prime Minister Netanyahu.

A man elected as president who has ordered NASA director Charles Bolden to pursue 3 new objectives: to “re-inspire children” to study science and math, to “expand our international relationships,” and to “reach out to the Muslim world.” No longer will the National Aeronautical and Space Administration concentrate on aeronautics and space.

A man elected as president, who on Aug. 14, 2010 backed the plans (according to Reuters) to build a mosque in the shadow of the missing Twin Towers – which were the target of the Islamic terrorists on September 11, 2001.

Shanksville, Pennsylvania is the place where the Americans on Flight 93 took control of their own fate. The title of the “memorial” there? The Crescent of Embrace. I am not making this up. This was approved by the National Park Service during the George W. Bush administration. You can also read about it here at creepingsharia. Since the memorial is a red crescent, is it a memorial to the killers? Because it is certainly NOT honoring the brave Americans who knowingly sacrificed their lives to save those at the intended target.

These things are just the tip of the iceberg.

I do not understand the past or present “leadership” in this country.

I do not understand the apologists for terrorism.

As a nation, we are going to “tolerate” ourselves into submission to an ideology devoted to conquering us and everyone else.

Sometimes I wonder if America even has the will to survive.

Will we wake up before it’s too late?

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Filed under Politics, September 11