Category Archives: Summer

Fashions, 1967

1967 was a fun year of fashion and had some really cute styles for teenagers.

Original caption:

“Confectionery Colors, this page, glow out to play all summer. Left: Trim T-shirt, about $8, crinkled over a ribbed A-liner, about $11. Center: Baby Beachdress, about $17. (See undercover notes on page 236.) Right: Swimsuit with its crinkle on the blouson side, about $18. Pakula earrings. All cotton fabrics by Halpern. Fashions are by Cole of California.”

The notes on page 236 were on what to wear underneath the spaghetti strapped dress.

My, how times have changed. Foundational garments, indeed.

Very often the tops that went with the hip-hugger skirts were ribbed knit material. I loved that look.

The mid-teen girls wore this style and I remember how cool they looked. I think I had one dress with the hip-hugger and wide belt look. And of course the baby doll style was quite popular in swimsuits, nightwear and dresses.

*Photograph and caption taken from the April 1967 issue of Seventeen Magazine.

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under 1960's, 1967, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Summer, Swimwear, Vintage Magazines

Swimwear for Girls, Teens and Ladies, 1960

for teens

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Ladies

for Sub-Teens

for Girls

Notice anything unusual, compared to the current selections ~ I mean, apart from how naked they aren’t?

The catalog featured 1 – just one – swimsuit for Teens and 2 full pages for Ladies.

And the group that are called Pre-Teens now were “Sub-Teens”. There are all kinds of jokes to be made from that, but I’ll let it go for now.

4 Comments

Filed under 1960, Ephemera, Fashion, Montgomery Ward, Summer, Vintage catalogs

1960 Ladies’ Fashions

From the 1960 Spring and Summer Montgomery Ward catalog.

1 Comment

Filed under 1960, Antiques/Vintage, Dresses (Including Formals), Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Montgomery Ward, Springtime, Summer, Vintage catalogs

Finishing What We Start

Lynette, Galveston beach

My friend, Lynette, has a new post (titled Tiddlywinks) up on her blog lynetteleitch which is really worth reading and heeding.

The photo is one I took of her when Joe and I spent a few days in Galveston with her and Mark, oh … about 6 years ago. She was in motion, so her arm is a bit blurry, but I like this one because it seems to capture a moment of joy.

A true Englishwoman – a bit of rain can’t keep her down!

2 Comments

Filed under England, Faith, Galveston, Summer, Texas, Vicissitudes of Life

Floor Fan – Made in the U.S.A.

Circulating fans don’t really do much to cool off a room, but they make us feel cooler. Hence, you can have the air conditioner set one degree higher (not really more than that; I’m not a martyr to the green thing; I just want to be comfortable and still save money on our electric bill), but only when you’re in the room. If you’re going to be in another for awhile, or gone from the house, it makes sense to just turn it off.

If you need a floor fan (and who doesn’t this year?), may I suggest that you look at the boxes to see where they’re made?

This oscillating Lasko fan is one that we recently purchased from Lowe’s. It was $39.00 and best of all, made right here in the U.S.A.

Surprising to me is that I really like the remote control. It’s the first one we’ve had with a remote, and it’s quite handy when I’m sitting at the computer, or across the room and I’m either too warm or too cool. Also, there’s a timer on it, but I haven’t read the booklet to see how to use it.

I think it was the only American made fan on the shelf.

*Update Sept. 10, 2011: This is the easier fan to take apart and clean that I’ve ever had. The cage has little clips all around that quickly release, then easily snap back together after cleaning.

2 Comments

Filed under Made in the U.S.A., Summer

Energy and Determination

Tisn’t spring anymore; I don’t care what the calendar says.

It’s June in Texas and it’s hot.

So – it’s summer.

Since I missed spring cleaning, I’m doing it now. However, the deep cleaning will have to wait because currently I’m working on clutter.

Every so often it hits me how negligent I’ve been in keeping an even-handed approach to bringing stuff in vs. hauling stuff out. The recycling gets taken care of often (because it will run you out of the house if you don’t), but the other things (clothes, shoes, magazines, books, etc.) tend to mushroom because I simply don’t deal with them on a regular basis.

My sister and I were talking about this yesterday, and I commented that for the first many years of our married life, I was better at sorting through stuff and dispensing with it. Every so often I’d clean out a closet or a drawer and send anything salable to Goodwill or Salvation Army, and throw away junk and generally clean. Sadly enough, I’ve grown lax.

I could probably look around for excuses such illness or busyness, but that’s all they’d be: excuses. Because I know that, except for the worst days (like recovering from surgery), something can be done. Doing anything is better than doing nothing.

My genetics didn’t bestow upon me the whirl of energy that my brother got, or the drive that my sister has, but I have enough of those traits to get by.

Our dad was a real go-getter. All his life, he worked manual labor jobs. Even during the last few years when he owned his own businesses, he left the office/bookwork duties to my mother.

His first job was hauling drinking water to the oil field hands in Oklahoma when he was 6 years old. He left school at a very young age to help care for his mother who was dying of tuberculosis. He rodeoed, worked in a Nabisco cracker factory, assembled Fords on the line in Detroit, learned welding and worked at Douglas Aircraft in the foundry, built houses, and a whole lot more. In his 50s, he roofed houses then he and my brother started their own business building service station canopies from Louisiana to west Texas, and north to Indiana.

At the age of 61, they bought a small local grocery/gas station/car repair business. Daddy was there at 6:00 every morning to open up, and washed down the concrete pad. Closing was at 8:00 p.m., after the shelves had been stocked and the floor mopped. He worked like that until the store was sold when he was 65. My brother has that kind of energy.

My mother was a hard worker, too, but mostly she was just determined. She graduated from high school at the age of 21 because it took that long to convince her dad that she really wanted a diploma; the nearest high school to their rural Kentucky home was far enough away that she had to go live with an uncle.

For her graduation, she wanted to look nice, so she earned money by picking strawberries to pay for her first permanent wave. It would’ve been the kind that had the curlers hooked by wires to a machine. ( And she looked lovely with that new perm.)

Daddy and Mama married when she was 28 and he was 34. I was born 11 years later. When she was 43, Mama developed a heart problem that required a lot of rest. But even so, she cooked breakfast and supper every day, sewed most of our clothes, hung the laundry out to dry and ironed it.

She did what she could as she could.

That’s the way both my parents were. They put one foot in front of the other when something had to be done. Neither one went out in search of extra work but they always did what had to/needed to be done and they didn’t complain about it. I have the idea that many, many people of my generation can say the same about their parents.

For instance, our yard was not landscaped – but it was mown every week.

Meals weren’t innovative and gourmet – but they were prepared every night.

My mother used to tell the story about learning to knit. My sister, Fran, had enrolled the two of them in a knitting class at the old Sears store at 21st and Yale. Although she’d been crocheting since she was a little girl, knitting was totally foreign to her.

She’d say that she knew she’d been the dumbest one in the class and she forced herself to concentrate on the stitches until her eyes watered and a tear dropped from her eye. The determination to not stop until she had mastered that stitch kept her from even wiping the tear away, but she learned it. It gave her such a feeling of accomplishment when teacher asked her to help one of the other students later on.

That happened when she was 50 years old. I would never call my mother an old dog – but she definitely learned new tricks!

Fran has that determination with getting things done. She used to work at one of the big petroleum companies in Tulsa typing in information for oil leases. Whole pages of nothing but numbers. Yikes! I’m doing good to handle phone numbers (and usually without area codes). Can you imagine sitting all day doing that?!

So, I’m not a dusk ’til dawn worker like my dad, and determination and I have more work to do on our relationship

but

“I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.” Philippians 4:13

2 Comments

Filed under 1960's, Faith, Family, Housekeeping, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Scripture, Summer, Texas