Tag Archives: Costumes

My Sister’s Paper Doll Altered Book

Fran's altered book cover


A few years ago my sister was in an altered book Round Robin. She chose paper dolls for her theme and she ended up with the most wonderful book!

Here are some of the pages. Unfortunately, I can’t give credit to the individual artists (because I don’t know them), but some of them initialed their pages. My sister did the cover herself.

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Filed under Altered Books, Childhood pastimes, Fashion, Paper Dolls, Using What You Have

Cozy Reading

100_8353Brenda over at Coffee, Tea, Books and Me is asking her blog readers to submit their favorite books and movies that are in the Cozy category. She defines them as ones that make her feel all warm and cozy in the winter weather. Partly because we live in the south, my definition would be a little different – books and movies that me feel contented. There’s more to it than that, but when I start trying to nail it down, it gets elusive.

For instance, Agatha Christie mysteries are considered cozies, but they almost always involve murder. No gory details or horrible unpleasantness – but murder, none the less. I struggle with my affection for her books. Surely a Christian shouldn’t be so fascinated with sin. If I’m wanting to rationalize, I could say that it’s actually the intricacies of logic and justice that intrigue me.

Cozy books of all types make up a good deal of my reading. I also read a lot of challenging non-fiction: political, Alzheimer’s tales, biographies, but I find that after a few of these books, I need to read something that calms me down a bit. Because, even though I believe those topics to be necessary and important to my life, they can be a bit stressful.

Anyway, here’s some of my list. It isn’t complete because I’m sure that I’ll remember an omitted favorite this afternoon.

I’ve used Brenda’s format, to help me compare my list to hers.

AUTHORS
M.C. Beaton -mostly mysteries: Edwardian, Scotland, Cotswolds
Elizabeth Caddell – light mid-20th century novels of England
Agatha Christie – mysteries
Emily Kimbrough – reminiscences of very early and mid-20th century
L.M. Montgomery – Anne of Green Gables series
Miss Read – very light and pleasant novels of an English village school
D.E. Stevenson – light English romances
Gladys Taber – journal-like books about living in New England
Laura Ingalls Wilder – Little House books

FICTION
+Little House in the Big Woods, Laura Ingalls Wilder
*Absolutely any of the Miss Read books
*Mrs. Miniver, Jan Struther (disclaimer: there is a chapter on fortune telling which I skipped. I don’t think witchcraft/occult is harmless fun.)
*The Gown of Glory, Agnes Sligh Turnbull (one of the reader reviews on Amazon compared it to Our Town.)
*The Nightingale, Agnes Sligh Turnbull (same town as The Gown of Glory, different people)
*Half Crown House, Helen Ashton (post WWII England)
*Owl’s Castle Farm, Primrose Cumming (mid-WWII English farm life)
*Now That April’s There, Daisy Neumann (English children returning home from America 1945)
SERIES
*Fairacre series by Miss Read
*Thrush Green series by Miss Read
*Some of the Mitford books by Jan Karon
*Reminisce Magazine books – collections of short personal stories from very early to mid-20th century

NON-FICTION – HOME ARTS
*A Thousand Ways to Please Your Husband with Bettina’s Best Recipes, Louise Bennett Weaver & Helen Cowles LeCron (either 1917 or 1932 edition)
*The Little House Cookbook, Barbara M. Walker
*If Teacups Could Talk, Emilie Barnes
*The Charms of Tea, by Victoria Magazine
*Beautiful Home on a Budget, Emilie Barnes & Yoli Brogger
*Timeless Treasures, Emilie Barnes
*Sew Pretty Homestyle, Tone Finnanger
*Crafting Vintage Style, Christina Strutt
*Creating Vintage Style, Lucinda Ganderton

BIOGRAPHIES & AUTOBIOGRAPHIES
*Farewell, Horton Foote
*In My Father’s House: the Years Before the Hiding Place, Corie ten Boom
*Agatha Christie: an Autobiography, Agatha Christie
*A Fortunate Grandchild, Miss Read
*Time Remembered, Miss Read

FASHION

*20th Century Fashion, John Peacock
*Fashion Accessories, John Peacock
*The Costume Collector’s Companion 1890-1990, Rosemary Hawthorne Air

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Filed under Books, Cooking, Cozy, Faith, Fiction, History, Tea

1893 Fashions

1893 Evening Gown, designed by Charles Frederick Worth

1893 Evening Gown, designed by Charles Frederick Worth

Today I wanted to show some of the popular fashions in 1893.

This hat was documented to have been worn to the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago by Janet dePrie(?)

This hat was documented to have been worn to the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago by Janet dePrie(?)

Hat very similar to the green straw one, shown at top of page.

Hat very similar to the green straw one, above.


Photographer: Crane Arto, Waterbury, Connecticutt

Lillian Russell, circa 1893

Lillian Russell, circa 1893

Lillian Russell performed at the fair. This photo was taken by the “Newsboy” studio, New York. Notice the large vertical pom poms on her hat.

1893 Fashions

1893 Fashions

1893 Fashions

1893 Fashions

Victorian Fashions 1893

Victorian Fashions 1893

The photographs of the green straw hat, Lillian Russell and the one by Crane Arto are from the book Vintage Hats and Bonnets 1770-1970
by Susan Langley. I bought this book at the Textile Museum in Lowell, Massachusetts in 2004. They were having a wonderful exhibit of ladies hats. It was one of the best museum visits I’ve ever had.

The black and white illustrations are from the Dover Publication: Victorian Fashions, a Pictorial Archive, 965 Illustrations Selected and Arranged by Carol Belanger Grafton. My husband gave me this book for Christmas last year.

The Worth evening gown was “sky blue damask with a pattern of pink chrysanthemum petals, and layers of embroidered lace and tulle. The gown is festooned with a glarland of pearls and crystal. The hairdo was designed by Lentheric.” The illustration is by Tom Tierney and is from the Dover publication Victorian Fashion Designs. It includes a cd-rom. It was also a gift from my husband.

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Filed under 1893, 19th Century, Chicago, Fashion, Hats, History

Waxahachie Chautauqua – Cotton, the Fabric of a Community

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We got there late and had to leave early, so we didn’t get to hear the Vocal Majority. But they’re on youtube, so we can hear them there and I’m just glad we got to go at all.
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First, Heather Boykin demonstrated the layers of clothing a Texas woman in the Victorian era would’ve worn to church or an event in the summer. She weighed before and after donning all the garments – it totaled 8 pounds. With all that and the corsets, it’s little wonder that the life expectancy was shorter.

The Emcee was Joe Green, who grew up chopping cotton. Between speakers, he recited his poetry or sang duets with Merry Agape. They were very good.

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Dr. Clayton Brown, History professor at TCU, spoke on the history of cotton in Ellis County and the Blackland Strip (the counties from the Red River south to San Antonio). Nancy Farrar shared the history of the county’s first cotton gin, which was her great-great-grandfather’s in the mid-1800’s.

Levee Singers
The Levee Singers performed for about an hour. They are four retirement aged fellows, kind of Kingston Trio-like, who have been singing together since the 1950’s. Very talented and energetic, they put on a good show and were just plain fun. They also are on youtube.

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“Cotton Clothing Through the Ages: Historical Fashion Show” was the last event we were able to see. Lauren Craig and her sisters demonstrated the history of fashion, modeling clothing that they’ve made for 4-H Fashion Shows. The outfits were amazing. Those girls can really sew.

Throughout the program, I learned how much easier our lives are now than those of previous generations. I am so grateful for all that the pioneers of this country did for us.

The exhibits tent had a quilting demonstration, a man from the cotton gin to answer questions, and a hand-cranked demonstration (I think it was a very small cotton gin, but I couldn’t get close enough to ask).

Next year the theme will be Railroads. I hope we can take our grandsons with us. When they get restless we can always take them over to the park area and let them run off steam.

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Filed under Events & Museums, Texas