Tag Archives: Doris Day

Doris Day Paper Dolls

Doris Day, Whtiman Publishing Company, 1955

Among serious paper doll collectors, I’d be considered a rank amateur. And that would be accurate, because I don’t collect things that I think might become valuable someday.

First, I buy what I can afford. No matter how much I may want something, I simply won’t buy it if it’s not affordable now.

Second, my favorites are replacements of what I had when I was a child and foolishly (arghhhh!) took to the burn barrel right before I got married. That was stupid on many levels, one of which is that I’ve forgotten several of them. Seeing paper doll clothes sometimes triggers a memory even more than the doll itself. I didn’t have all that many paper dolls, because even though they were cheap (the typical price was .25 for a package), most girls I knew didn’t have lots and lots. We were not an over-indulged generation. (I had one Barbie and was thrilled to have even that.)

Third, I prefer to buy vintage, and pre-loved (use, played with) dolls and/or their clothes. Although I do have several books of new ones, I get the urge to get out the scissors. I usually don’t, but I want to. There are several booklets of Dover paper dolls in my box, and a few from other places (mostly museums, like the Bath Costume Museum) and they all remain uncut.

Doris Day Paper Doll Clothes, 1955

The only uncut vintage book I have are these Doris Day, 1955 issues by Whitman. I bought them back in the early 1990’s at an antique store in Kingwood, Texas and I paid way too much for them. Paper dolls were hard to find. This was before anyone except hackers and professionals had even heard of the internet. Now anyone from anyplace can post them and they’re more affordable (which is great). In fact, the prices have come way down (probably due to their ready accessibility). About 1999, I bid on an old set of Lucille Ball paper dolls on ebay. Chagrin prevents me from disclosing how how I bid, but let’s just say that it was well below the $160.00 that was the winning bid. Those same dolls can be bought now for far less and many laser copies are available, too.

Doris Day Paper Doll Clothes, 1955

Anyway, in the case next to the Doris Day set, was one of Elizabeth Taylor from the same era. They were priced a little more and since I just like Doris better than Elizabeth, I bought them.

Doris Day Paper Doll Clothes, 1955

Now it’s 17 years later, and they’re probably worth about the same as what I paid for them. Which, all things considered, isn’t really all that bad. It’s a better investment than that lousy Mexican meal I had in Kingwood.

*Go here for more Doris Day paper doll clothes.

*Update: April 20, 2011 – When enlarged, the paper dolls get very pixily and unpleasant. I tried scanning them in on the highest resolution setting I could, and it didn’t change them at all.

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Filed under 1955, Actresses, Childhood pastimes, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Paper Dolls, Updates

Celebrity Recipes – Good Housekeeping December 1964

Yesterday I posted photos from the December 1964 issue of Good Housekeeping. Carol from Old Glory Cottage asked for the celebrity recipes referred to in the photo. (Carol has some great vintage Christmas images in her sidebar.)

There are too many for me to type all of them and they’re posted in the back of the magazine all chopped up, a column or two on each page so too difficult to scan. But I tell you what I’ll do: since Carol asked for it, I’ll include Lucy’s today, and list each celebrity and the name of their recipe and if anyone wants one, please leave a comment and I’ll post as many of them as I can.

Here’s what it says:

“Lucille Ball, one of Hollywood’s most hospitable stars, often treats dinner guests to this ‘happy ending’.

APPLE JOHN
Make about two hours before serving as follows:
1. Start heating oven to 375 degrees. Grease a 2-quart casserole. Fill it with 8 cups thinly sliced, pared, cooking apples, 1/2 cup granulated sugar, 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1 tablespoon grated lemon peel, 2 tablespoons lemon juice and 1/4 cup water; then toss together with a fork. Bake, covered, 1 hour or until apples are tender. Now turn oven heat up to 450 degrees.

2. In bowl combine 2 cups packaged biscuit mix and 2 tablespoons granulated sugar; quickly stir in 2 to 3 tablespoons melted butter or margarine and 1/2 cup milk. Then drop, by rounded tablespoonfuls, around top edge of casserole, also one in center of biscuit ring. Bake, uncovered, about 12 to 15 minutes or until biscuits are golden and done. Cool slightly.

3. Serve warm, with vanilla ice cream on top of each serving. Makes 9 servings.”

Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson: Pecan Pie

Julie Andrews: Striezel, Hot Mincemeat Pie with Rum Sauce

Doris Day: Green and Gold Salad

Bing Crosby: Wild Duck

Deborrah Kerr: Creamy Raspberry Cups

Patty Duke: Crunch Walnut Bread

Jack Benny: Superior Fried Chicken

Polly Bergen: Chili

Tony Curtis: Hungarian Kipfel

Shirley Booth: Chess Tarts

Fannie Hurst: Indienne Beef Stew

Peggy Lee: Hearts of Palm Salad

Johnny Carson: Christmas Waldorf

Eartha Kitt: Salade Nicoise

Danny Thomas: Homos Be Tahinee

Gina Lollobrigida: Christmas Wreath Cookies

Carol Channing: Golden Popcorn Balls

Rick Nelson: Beef Tartare, Stuffed Brussel Sprouts

Beatrice Lillie: Peel Fold Christmas Trifle

Raymond Burr: Grand Marnier Chocolate Mousse

Carol Burnett: Chicken Casserole

Inger Stevens: De Luxe Rice Pudding

Hugh Downs: Nut Filled Cakes

Blanche Thebom: Doppa I Grytan

Walter Cronkite: Harvard Beets

Eileen Farrell: Citrus Froth

Elke Sommer: Christmas Stollen

Dick Van Dyke: Brandied Sweet Potatoes

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Filed under 1960's, Baking, Christmas, Cooking, Paper Dolls, Vintage Christmas, Vintage Magazines