Tag Archives: Emily Kimbrough

The Letter K

K is for Kimbrough, Emily ~ one of my favorite authors. More on her later.

The K pages are from Ready-To-Use Decorative Letters, Copyright-Free Designs; Edited by Carol Belanger Grafton. 1986 Dover Publications.

The girl at the writing desk is from Ready-To-Use Old-Fashioned Illustrations of Books, Reading & Writing, Copyright-Free Designs; Selected and arranged by Carol Belanger Grafton. 1992 Dover Publications.

Leave a comment

Filed under Authors, Books, Clip Art

15 Authors


This idea came from Brenda’s post at Coffee, Tea, Books and Me. She got the idea from Sarah, at Thoroughly Alive.

 

 

How enjoyable to read another person’s list of favorite authors or books! When visiting in others’ homes, I’m always interested to see what’s on their bookshelf. Does it tell us anything about people to see what they read? Probably. Actually, I’m sure it does.

Several years ago our younger son (an adult at the time) told us that his friends were offended at the books in our living room. I doubt he was referring to the craft, gardening or music books. Surely he meant the ones on conservative politics and Christianity.

It seems that I’m always searching for someone who likes the same books that I love, because I so want to discuss them. However, I don’t think I have one single friend that shares an interest in very many of my favorite books or authors.

It’s funny because when I find a friend who likes to read, we seldom read the same books, even though we might have lots of other things in common. My friend, Patti, is a dedicated Christian, likes antiques and stories of the old days, tea cups, family history, card making and scrapbooking and southern gospel music. We share all of those things.

However, she also likes talk shows, loves country music (this one still has me shaking my head because she’s from New Jersey and I’m from the south. If it’s country and it’s not Johnny Cash or Patsy Cline, I’m probably not happy); Patti can’t stand Sara Palin and Dick Cheny (I love them both). She voted for Ralph Nadar and likes Mitt Romney. If they were the only choices, I’d be staying home on election day.

So, despite the fact that we’re both voracious readers, Patti and I rarely read or enjoy the same books. The only 2 exceptions I can think of (yes, yes, I know… of which I can think or something like that) are “

and

.

I really love the idea of a book club, but my ideal would be a cozy book group or at least a cozy mystery one.

Anyway, my list of most read or beloved authors goes something like this:

NON-FICTION

Emily Barnes
Peg Bracken
Priscilla Buckley
William F. Buckley
Emily Kimbrough
Norman Longmate
Corrie ten Boom

FICTION
Jane Austen
M.C. Beaton
Elizabeth Caddell
Agatha Christie
Erle Stanley Gardner
L.M. Montgomery
Miss Read
Laura Ingalls Wilder

A few words about authors
I love Miss Read’s books so much that I probably should’ve listed her twice.

And even though I’ve enjoyed the writings of Jan Karon and John Grisham, they’re missing from this list for different reasons. Even though parts of the Mitford books are wonderful, and I think that Karon is a very talented writer, there are parts of her books that I really don’t like. And I disliked her

so badly that I didn’t get past the first chapter. I intensely dislike whining (it’s one of my own and unloveliest traits) and that book is one big whine.

Up until about 5 years ago I had read about everything that John Grisham had written. In fact,

is one of my all time favorite books. So, he would be on my B list, along with Jan Karon, Harper Lee, D.E. Stevenson and several others.


If I were less truthful, I’d list C.S. Lewis because I have tremendous respect for his work, but his works are so hard to read. Countless times, I’ve started reading Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, then give up when the going gets deep. But I hope someday to read not only them, but also other volumes of his that I’ve collected over the years.

And Charles Dickens: I’ve read parts of A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, The Old Curiosity Shop and a considerable part of David Copperfield. The only one of his that I’ve actually finished was Bleak House. My interest was piqued in the story after I began watching the BBC version. The book was incredibly better.

Dickens was an amazing writer.

5 Comments

Filed under Books, Children's, Cozy, Fiction

Cozy Reading

100_8353Brenda over at Coffee, Tea, Books and Me is asking her blog readers to submit their favorite books and movies that are in the Cozy category. She defines them as ones that make her feel all warm and cozy in the winter weather. Partly because we live in the south, my definition would be a little different – books and movies that me feel contented. There’s more to it than that, but when I start trying to nail it down, it gets elusive.

For instance, Agatha Christie mysteries are considered cozies, but they almost always involve murder. No gory details or horrible unpleasantness – but murder, none the less. I struggle with my affection for her books. Surely a Christian shouldn’t be so fascinated with sin. If I’m wanting to rationalize, I could say that it’s actually the intricacies of logic and justice that intrigue me.

Cozy books of all types make up a good deal of my reading. I also read a lot of challenging non-fiction: political, Alzheimer’s tales, biographies, but I find that after a few of these books, I need to read something that calms me down a bit. Because, even though I believe those topics to be necessary and important to my life, they can be a bit stressful.

Anyway, here’s some of my list. It isn’t complete because I’m sure that I’ll remember an omitted favorite this afternoon.

I’ve used Brenda’s format, to help me compare my list to hers.

AUTHORS
M.C. Beaton -mostly mysteries: Edwardian, Scotland, Cotswolds
Elizabeth Caddell – light mid-20th century novels of England
Agatha Christie – mysteries
Emily Kimbrough – reminiscences of very early and mid-20th century
L.M. Montgomery – Anne of Green Gables series
Miss Read – very light and pleasant novels of an English village school
D.E. Stevenson – light English romances
Gladys Taber – journal-like books about living in New England
Laura Ingalls Wilder – Little House books

FICTION
+Little House in the Big Woods, Laura Ingalls Wilder
*Absolutely any of the Miss Read books
*Mrs. Miniver, Jan Struther (disclaimer: there is a chapter on fortune telling which I skipped. I don’t think witchcraft/occult is harmless fun.)
*The Gown of Glory, Agnes Sligh Turnbull (one of the reader reviews on Amazon compared it to Our Town.)
*The Nightingale, Agnes Sligh Turnbull (same town as The Gown of Glory, different people)
*Half Crown House, Helen Ashton (post WWII England)
*Owl’s Castle Farm, Primrose Cumming (mid-WWII English farm life)
*Now That April’s There, Daisy Neumann (English children returning home from America 1945)
SERIES
*Fairacre series by Miss Read
*Thrush Green series by Miss Read
*Some of the Mitford books by Jan Karon
*Reminisce Magazine books – collections of short personal stories from very early to mid-20th century

NON-FICTION – HOME ARTS
*A Thousand Ways to Please Your Husband with Bettina’s Best Recipes, Louise Bennett Weaver & Helen Cowles LeCron (either 1917 or 1932 edition)
*The Little House Cookbook, Barbara M. Walker
*If Teacups Could Talk, Emilie Barnes
*The Charms of Tea, by Victoria Magazine
*Beautiful Home on a Budget, Emilie Barnes & Yoli Brogger
*Timeless Treasures, Emilie Barnes
*Sew Pretty Homestyle, Tone Finnanger
*Crafting Vintage Style, Christina Strutt
*Creating Vintage Style, Lucinda Ganderton

BIOGRAPHIES & AUTOBIOGRAPHIES
*Farewell, Horton Foote
*In My Father’s House: the Years Before the Hiding Place, Corie ten Boom
*Agatha Christie: an Autobiography, Agatha Christie
*A Fortunate Grandchild, Miss Read
*Time Remembered, Miss Read

FASHION

*20th Century Fashion, John Peacock
*Fashion Accessories, John Peacock
*The Costume Collector’s Companion 1890-1990, Rosemary Hawthorne Air

6 Comments

Filed under Books, Cooking, Cozy, Faith, Fiction, History, Tea