Tag Archives: John Peacock

Annotated Progression of Ladies Fashion, 1785 – 1820

Having just read Persuasion by Jane Austen, I’m particularly interested in the details of that era. Today at the library I was able to check out several non-fiction books about her and early 19th century historical details.

However, this post features selections from my own copy of John Peacock’s broad treatise on fashion history.

These illustrations only roughly represent her years. She lived from 1775 to 1817; the pictures are for fashions from 1785 to 1820. Since Miss Austen completed the rough draft of Persuasion in 1817, her stylish characters would’ve worn dresses from the last sketch below.

(Clicking on a picture will enlarge it.)

Also, please note that they are intended to show the progression and details of fashion development. I think it helps to see how styles can sometimes ease from one to another. Other times they change radically.

1785 - 1798

1798 - 1800

1800 - 1811

Regency 1811 - 1820

Sketches are from John Peacock’s book: Costume 1066 – 1966, A Complete Guide to English Costume Design and History (copyrighted 1986). Mr. Peacock was the senior costume designer for BBC Television when the book was printed.

The calligraphy is by Rachel Yallop.

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Filed under 1700s, 1800s, Books, Clothing, Dresses (Including Formals), England, Ephemera, Fashion, Femininity, Hairstyles, Hats, History, Jane Austen, Shoes

Fashion Details, 1890 – 1895

Taken from the book “Costume 1066 – 1966” by John Peacock, pages 104 & 105

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Filed under 19th Century, Books, Fashion

1920s fashions, Altered Book Page

This is part II in a series of altered book fashion pages. These sketches were photocopied from some John Peacock books that I have:

Twentieth-Century Fashion : The Complete Sourcebook, 1993

Fashion Accessories: The Complete 20th Century, 2000

The 1920s (Fashion Sourcebooks), 1997

Mr. Peacock was the senior costume designer for BBC London.

Click here to go to the previous post.

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Filed under 1920s, Altered Books, Crafts, Crafts - Paper, Ephemera, Fashion, Hats