Category Archives: Non-Fiction

Shuttemup Cookies (a Peg Bracken Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe)

A visitor to my blog asked about Peg Bracken’s Shuttemup Cookie recipe and I found it in her 1976 book,  The I Hate to Cook Almanack – A Book of Days (Recipes & Relief for the Reluctant Cook and the Harried Houseperson).

 

I haven’t tried this one, but I’ve never gone wrong on any of her other recipes.  When I do try it, I’ll post an update.

 

Here you go, Aaron, just as Peg wrote it.

 

SHUTTEMUP COOKIES

(The fastest chocolate-chip cooky)

 

Cream together:

1 cup butter or oleo*

1 cup brown sugar

 

Then add:

2 cups flour

1 6-ounce package of chocolate chips

1 cup nuts, chopped

 

Mix it, press it into a thirteen-by-nine inch jelly-roll pan, and bake twenty-five minutes at 350 degrees.  While it’s still warm, cut it in bars.  If you forget to, just break it up when it’s cool.

*oleomargarine

 

 

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Filed under Baking, Books, Cookbooks, Cookies, Food, Non-Fiction, Recipes

Corrie’s Memories of Christmases Past

Corrie's Christmas Memories

Corrie Ten Boom Christmas story

Corrie Ten Boom Christmas story-1

Corrie Ten Boom Christmas story-2

Corrie ten Boom
was the youngest daughter of a Dutch watchmaker. She learned the trade, never married and worked alongside her aging father, Casper, in Haarlem.

The Christian faith of the ten Boom family was a living faith. Corrie’s sister, Betsie, never married due to poor health. Corrie herself was jilted when she was a young woman, and stayed single the rest of her life.

She and Betsie used their spare time teaching Sunday School and ministering God’s love to the mentally challenged.

A basic element of their love for Jesus was a love for his chosen people.

During World War II, the Nazis invaded their tiny country. When Holland’s Jews were being rounded up, murdered or sent away, the ten Booms created a special place in their home to hide them, at great peril to themselves.

Eventually all the members of the family were arrested and sent to concentration camps. Corrie’s sister Betsie and her 90 year-old father perished.

In spite of all the persecution and evil treatment she suffered, she was one of the best known examples of the Christian faith in the 20th century.

Miss ten Boom shared her story in “The Hiding Place“.

The excerpt above is from Corrie’ Christmas Memories, c. 1976, Fleming H. Revell.

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Filed under Authors, Books, Children, Christmas, Corrie ten Boom, Faith, History, Holocaust, Non-Fiction, World War II

Letter to Audrey Hepburn


Once upon a time (about 3 years ago) there was a perfectly marvelous independent bookstore in Weatherford, Texas. And my kind husband bought this perfectly marvelous book for me there.

The Audrey Hepburn Treasures by Ellen Erwin and Jessica Z. Diamond.

It’s a totally different kind of book than I’d ever seen before. Not just prose. Not merely prose + photographs.

Each chapter has a glassine envelope with reprints ranging from contracts to letters to the program from one of her early shows to greeting cards she sent. And lots, lots more.

Such an interesting format.

And here is the reprint of an early fan letter she received. I think it’s touching that she kept it.


Here’s the lovely lady playing a cigarette girl in the 1950 film “Laughter in Paradise”.

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Filed under 1950, Actresses, Bookstores, Ephemera, Femininity, Letters and Correspondence, Non-Fiction

The Ettiquette of Notes and Letters, 1937

Oh, how things have changed.

Consulting my 1937 copy of The New Ettiquette by Margery Wilson, I learned that one never refers to the paper used in letter writing as “stationery”. The correct terms are “letter-paper, note-paper or writing-paper.”

Nowadays folks would just be happy to be on the receiving end – regardless of what it’s called.

(I apologize for the fuzzy quality of these scans. The book is 75 years old, fragile and slightly warped. It becomes a little clearer when clicked on and enlarged. When I find my camera, I’ll try photographing the pages and see if that improves the appearance.)

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Filed under 1937, Books, Correspondence, Ephemera, Non-Fiction